Concepts the american mind cannot comprehend.

I'll start.

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  1. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    This soundtrack plays like CNN's list of greatest hits.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      I don't get it.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        kill Black person network

  2. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Wish that were me. God I hate England.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      I assume there are public toilets, books and trees in England. What is stopping you from replicating his lifestyle?

  3. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    There's a change of mindset going on worldwide: people who opt for a modest life with genuine contentment. That's what the movie's about.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      this movie isn't about anything, it's just beautifully filmed hollow shell

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        American spotted.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        It is above a lot of things, you're just not paying attention or isn't able to grasp them. A lot of important concepts are displayed in a show don't tell way. One of them is expressed out loud in the beautiful bike ride scene: next time is next time. Now is now.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          >next time is next time. Now is now.
          wow, that's deep, maybe even highschool deep

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            The beauty of simple things is obiously not in their complexity. Concepts don't have to be deep or convoluted to be valuable.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            It's commonsensical and yet you were filtered by it because you seem flustered, distracted and react defensively instead of being focused.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          i'll call now

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        the japs wanted a documentary about their new public bathrooms, they got a movie instead and it's a nice companion film to Paris, Texas

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          I wouldn't compare it to Paris, Texas (both good but very different in tone/visuals etc) but to Jim Jarmusch's Paterson, which addresses very similar themes. It's not as good but well worth watching.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >people who opt for a modest life with genuine contentment.
      yes, they will own nothing, and they will be happy

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        But that's the point, is it not?
        Achieving a certain, if momentary, happiness while not pursuing money or mindless property.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          fake happiness as he breaks when his sister visit

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            But that is but a moment in a day in a life that otherwise seems to be filled with content. Is it all a lie merely because he's clearly sad for a portion of the movie?

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            He cries because of his resentment against his father/family rigid expectations that his sister's visit evokes, so he acknowledges the sadness, lets it go and smiles afterwards. He unburdens himself as the sun rises again.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        They'll owe enough according to their needs. The guy has a house, a cellphone, books, a social life and freedom. Does it seem that he needs more?
        Ofc WEF-style insanity is absurd, but so is consooming and cluttering your house with dreck.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >contentment
      the thing is, the movie baits you into thinking that's the case, but heavily (and subtly) implies he's miserable. Only giving it away at the last scene.
      Whether it was lost love, highlighted by the hostess girl, or his family and father issues/childhood. Or his commitment to only listening to nostalgic tapes. Or the gardening hobby, which is very popular with people trying to escape depression.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >the movie baits you into thinking that's the case, but heavily (and subtly) implies he's miserable.
        You're 100% projecting. He seems perfect content throughout the movie as all his needs are met: economic, professional, cultural, social (he has casual friends at the bar and at the restaurant). His routine seems effortless and organic.
        It's also implied at least 2 women are interested in him (older singing lady and lonely woman eating lunch at the square) and he chooses-- at least in that slice of life that we see-- to simply acknowledge that interest. His niece obviously adores him and his coworker's romantic interest also looks up to him. His emotional life was subdued but active because he connected to people and vice-versa.
        As I mentioned here

        He cries because of his resentment against his father/family rigid expectations that his sister's visit evokes, so he acknowledges the sadness, lets it go and smiles afterwards. He unburdens himself as the sun rises again.

        , you misunderstood the last scene completely: he was not sad about this present, he was recalling the sadness in his past. Wenders ended the movie brilliantly by taunting a series of fade-outs (which were shadows projected on the windshield) but actually closes the movie with a serene and triumphant sunrise.
        The movie addresses something that's perhaps the ultimate existential realization: there is no "happiness" and the key to life is contentment, which varies from person to person but is predicated on fully appreciating the present moment and the small joys in life.
        Depressed people are often characterized by a lack of social activities and practical hobbies and he's just the opposite: a active person that takes care of his appearance/grooming and never seems sluggish or passive because he's energized by life's discreet rewards.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          he's clearly not well.
          it wasn't a cathartic cry of effulgent happiness.
          It was a manic low episode, which coincides with randomly breaking down in your car and cycling through the mania.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            Again: you're projecting. Clear your mind and be honest with yourself.

            • 6 days ago
              Anonymous

              You're going to look at this frame and tell me it's genuine happiness?

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                He's releasing the tension of his interaction with his sister and the memories it brought. By doing so, he moves on in a way that's healthy.
                Being pent-up is not good for you and these armchair psychologist definitions can be a disease in themselves.
                The movie offers a much more genuine solution: being aware of one's feelings so that they'll be released and then moving forward. Content people feel sad on occasion and let the feeling come and go instead of bottling it up.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                amazing that you think this elaborate and completely unfounded head-canon makes more sense than a movie about simplicity, with a simplistic scene of the trauma-suffering protag finally cracking

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                I think he nearly cracked, but the prospect of a new day and a new dawn made him content with his life again, he tries to avoid the suffering by living in the present and he's happy there. But no one is capable of avoiding the past for much longer, so the past caught up with him, unloads his feelings ready to resume his ordinary yet in the present life

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                He went through an emotional experience, which is normal and healthy if a personal needs to validate that emotion.
                After releasing it he felt good again because it wasn't draining his subconscious, he allowed it to express itself instead of denying its existence.
                It's the best we can do about the past: let the feelings it evokes arise as needed, teach us and be released.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                No, it's about contentment. The human condition entails certain aspects that you either acknowledge or spend your life fighting. One of them is that the idea of happiness is not just unattainable but actually leads to a feeling of dissatisfaction as ppl look for something that doesn't exist.
                The guy obviously had a rich family and material comforts at his disposal (it's not told in the movie but Wenders said that in the background story he wrote for the actor the character was an exec at a big family business but got fed up with the pressure) and he lives the life he chose to live and the experienced the joys he focused on.
                [...]
                No, it's just that you sound emotionally stunted and in denial so you react emotionally.
                Your comment seems defensive and redundant as I said from the beginning that it's a movie about living life matter of factly instead of clinging to layers of self-delusion, and the crying scene is a moment of emotional release that is indeed simple but many people needlessly resist and resent.
                Being simple isn't that simple when you live in denial and the movie offers a beautiful counterexample.

                This was my general takeaway. But, also that you can't run away from your past, or the external world/relationships forever. You may make a perfectly content life for yourself, but reality will seep through eventually, challenging you to re-engage with the world and to come out of the shell you've made for yourself. I interpreted the ending as him grappling with this and the emotions brought up from having his tailored, safe existence interrupted from a "challenge" by the world to "come back". In a way. But that may be projecting on my part. This film was pretty poignant for me since I've basically been a NEET after bombing out of a PhD program and failing my career I thought I was destined for.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >also that you can't run away from your past, or the external world/relationships forever.
                Yes. But he actively chose what to do and what not to do; who to communicate with and who to avoid. He was using agency instead of evasion.
                His life had a certain amount of discipline and routine (which are btw conducive to contentment when they derive from your choices) and at the same time life is filled with these unforeseen interactions that he navigated through as best as he possibly could even they cost him materially (the cassettes) or emotionally (his sister's impromptu visit/request to come back to his former life).
                > I interpreted the ending as him grappling with this and the emotions brought up from having his tailored, safe existence interrupted from a "challenge" by the world to "come back".
                Yes. He probably recalled his ordeal and ofc also mourned the loss of contact with relatives,both of which were normal emotional responses.
                >This film was pretty poignant for me since I've basically been a NEET after bombing out of a PhD program and failing my career I thought I was destined for.
                Give Paterson which I mentioned above a watch. As for Japanese culture, it offers solace in that it makes us realize that life is transient and flows. Make the most of what is.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                True, I was careful to avoid letting myself fall into interpreting his behavior through a pathological lens. He leads a purposeful, self-directed life and is perfectly capable to interacting with others normally when needed, and even to be assertive (the cassettes). But, I do think it is likely a push and pull. The scenes with the karaoke singing women, and the niece were clear signs to me that he still longed for human connection, deep down. And was grappling with re-engaging.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                Meant for

                >also that you can't run away from your past, or the external world/relationships forever.
                Yes. But he actively chose what to do and what not to do; who to communicate with and who to avoid. He was using agency instead of evasion.
                His life had a certain amount of discipline and routine (which are btw conducive to contentment when they derive from your choices) and at the same time life is filled with these unforeseen interactions that he navigated through as best as he possibly could even they cost him materially (the cassettes) or emotionally (his sister's impromptu visit/request to come back to his former life).
                > I interpreted the ending as him grappling with this and the emotions brought up from having his tailored, safe existence interrupted from a "challenge" by the world to "come back".
                Yes. He probably recalled his ordeal and ofc also mourned the loss of contact with relatives,both of which were normal emotional responses.
                >This film was pretty poignant for me since I've basically been a NEET after bombing out of a PhD program and failing my career I thought I was destined for.
                Give Paterson which I mentioned above a watch. As for Japanese culture, it offers solace in that it makes us realize that life is transient and flows. Make the most of what is.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >he still longed for human connection, deep down
                He had plenty of them. The niece's visit was a surprise and his other interactions were subdued but nurturing and spontaneous, he wasn't fishing for attention but part of a social milieu where his presence was cherished.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          he's clearly not well.
          it wasn't a cathartic cry of effulgent happiness.
          It was a manic low episode, which coincides with randomly breaking down in your car and cycling through the mania.

          let's be real movie is about massive coping

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            No, it's about contentment. The human condition entails certain aspects that you either acknowledge or spend your life fighting. One of them is that the idea of happiness is not just unattainable but actually leads to a feeling of dissatisfaction as ppl look for something that doesn't exist.
            The guy obviously had a rich family and material comforts at his disposal (it's not told in the movie but Wenders said that in the background story he wrote for the actor the character was an exec at a big family business but got fed up with the pressure) and he lives the life he chose to live and the experienced the joys he focused on.

            amazing that you think this elaborate and completely unfounded head-canon makes more sense than a movie about simplicity, with a simplistic scene of the trauma-suffering protag finally cracking

            No, it's just that you sound emotionally stunted and in denial so you react emotionally.
            Your comment seems defensive and redundant as I said from the beginning that it's a movie about living life matter of factly instead of clinging to layers of self-delusion, and the crying scene is a moment of emotional release that is indeed simple but many people needlessly resist and resent.
            Being simple isn't that simple when you live in denial and the movie offers a beautiful counterexample.

  4. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Why does wageslaving in Japan seem so comfy compared to America?

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Lack of a certain type of person that makes things difficult for everyone around them

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      it's not though

      japanese salarymen literally kill themselves out of shame because they left one minute before they were supposed to

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      no filthy loud Black folk on the jap countryside but its changing thanks to jap government being shabbo goyim dick suckers

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >implying they have a say in this
        Japan is owned by the israeli economic zone of america, I am surprised that it took this long for them to force multiculturalism down the japs throat without lube

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        The possible 800,000 immigrants will be 1)moderate to high-skilled 2)carefully vetted and 3)mostly Asian.
        Japan is paying attention to the social tragedies in the US, Canada, France etc and won't make the same mistake because it's a country that thinks longterm.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          I've lived in Japan for over a decade and that is horseshit. Same BS they spewed in Canada, the US and England. In reality
          >mostly Asian
          jeets of various stripes
          >vetted
          no criminal record which isn't an issue as record keeping is awful in their subcontinent
          >moderate to high skilled
          i.e. can work in a curry shop
          Their Japanese is unintelligible, they make no effort whatsoever to assimilate, they babble loudly nonstop in public and on the trains in their gurpa delurpa language, neighborhoods they move to become dirty in a matter of days. Then there's the increase of rape and sexual assaults.
          Stop falling for propaganda.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >I've lived in Japan for over a decade
            Anecdotal evidence made worse by that fact we're talking about the present.
            >jeets of various stripes
            Very wrong: most immigrants in Japan (which are just 2% of the total population) are Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese and Filipino.
            >no criminal record which isn't an issue as record keeping is awful in their subcontinent
            It's much better than having none or important people from high-crime countries as Biden has done.
            >i.e. can work in a curry shop
            Including services but also IT etc. People will be employed according to their skills instead of receiving gibs and roaming around cities as the illegals are doing in the US of A. As for language skills those will be required as needed, many foreign workers in Japan can't speak Japanese- but again, they're workers, they're productive instead of zombies, lazyasses or leeches.

            • 6 days ago
              Anonymous

              *or importING people

            • 6 days ago
              Anonymous

              you've never even been to Japan. Either a jeet yourself or a israelite
              The number of jeets roaming around has exploded in the past year or two. They are everywhere now and despite your claims of being 'employed according to their skills' you see packs of them all over in the middle of the day.
              You have no idea what you are talking about and will just parrot whatever approved messaging you have on your plate. Why you would do that when you have never lived in Japan, do not speak Japanese and know virtually nothing about life here aside from wiki statistics and CNN articles is baffling.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >you've never even been to Japan. Either a jeet yourself or a israelite
                That's either low IQ trolling or an equally low IQ ad hominem/cringe non-argument so I didn't read another word of your nonsense. Concession accepted etc

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                You have never lived in Japan, do not speak Japanese and know virtually nothing about life here

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                Your own subjective impression isn't worth shit, dummy.
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdotal_evidence Next time, instead of embarrassing yourself get educated on the facts and figures:
                >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_Japan#Long_term_residents_on_limited_duration_employment
                >Being a country with a total estimated population of 125.57 million in 2020,[2] the resident foreign population in Japan amounts to approximately 2.29% of the total population.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >Anecdotal evidence made worse by that fact we're talking about the present.
                >2020
                You have never lived in Japan, do not speak Japanese and know virtually nothing about life here

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >You have never lived in Japan
                You're clinging to a low IQ non-argument. I assume you'll eventually come to terms with that. Also, the numbers haven't varied post-covid.
                Feel free to post any actual evidence that contradicts what I said about selective, minimal immigration in Japan as opposed to the chaotic, unbridled, socially disruptive and often illegal immigration flood in the US, Canada etc

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >chaotic, unbridled, socially disruptive and often illegal immigration flood in the US
                Let's use your own source for this one
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States#Effects_of_immigration
                >Immigrants have not been found to increase crime in the United States, and immigrants overall are associated with lower crime rates than natives.[14][15][16][170] Some research even suggests that increases in immigration may partly explain the reduction in the U.S. crime rate.[171][172] According to one study, sanctuary cities—which adopt policies designed to not prosecute people solely for being an illegal immigrant—have no statistically meaningful effect on crime.
                If it's on Wikipedia it must be true
                You have never lived in Japan, do not speak Japanese and know virtually nothing about life here

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                have not been found to increase crime in the United States,
                Loitering/leeching off taxpayers are criminal in that they have a negative social effect including drug use, littering, begging etc.
                There are no walking dead crowds of unemployed immigrants roaming around Japan, living in hotels paid for by the taxpayer etc.
                In NYC and LA there are already 3rd world-level streets filled with peddlers, children selling stuff in subway wagons etc.
                You won't find that in Japan because immigrants will work there for a living as they should do anywhere they migrate to.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                People on this site love pretending to be the authority on Japan for some reason. When they encounter someone who actually lived there it mind breaks them

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            also 100% guaranteed they'll take Japan's more lax police and low crime and take advantage of it and the government won't let the cops do shit about it.

            sucks going there is so expensive, i was hoping to visit Japan before i died but it's gonna turn into a shithole like all the immigrants did to Europe

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >so comfy compared to America?
      Japan has one of the highest suicide rates in the world

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        japan has finally been addressing their insane wageslave culture, but it's slow going

  5. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    A truly content man would not engage in pornographic and vulgar pursuits such as "making movies".

  6. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I hate this fricking movie.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Why? And what movie would you recommend us instead that shares some of the concepts?

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        what concepts, it's a Live Laugh Love: The Movie, pure schlock for middle aged women and orientalists

  7. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, when would women ever experience humility through the act of cleaning? When has that ever been a part of their society-mandated role?
    Weird post.

  8. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    >put raw poem on rice
    >that’ll be $500
    Really?

  9. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I don't want to live a life filled with content, I want to do something great like I don't know, TKD maybe

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      ywds

  10. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I feel like it's impossible to be happy with a modest life in the current technologically advanced world.

    Idk if this is simply an illusion but it feels like if you really want you can achieve anything.

    And thanks to the advancement in technology the possibilities being rich opens up is just too appealing.

    The scary thing about living modestly is that what if you change your mind and suddenly do want to live lavishly and experience everything life has to offer? Unless you have millions saved the opportunity might have passed and you are left to live in regret.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not convinced there is any right or wrong answer. Rather one should be prepared to accept the inevitable suffering each path will lead to.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        I feel like it's something you have to experience for yourself like the guy in the movie if we assume he tasted the rich life before like the director said. I wouldn't recommend deciding to live like this while you are still young and have opportunities. You can still do that when you're old no need to rush.

  11. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    >YOU WILL CLEAN TOILETS ALL DAY AND YOU WILL BE HAPPY!
    no.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      bump

  12. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >No, it's just that you sound emotionally stunted and in denial so you react emotionally.
    > instead of clinging to layers of self-delusion
    Oh the irony.
    Yes, it's perfectly sane to
    >habitually listen to the same ~dozen tapes for multiple decades
    >refuse to even talk to your co-workers or anyone at all
    >have a very isolated job and existence in general
    >refuse to reconcile and try to fix your estranged family issues
    >break down in your car crying
    The movie has so many red flags for him, and you stubbornly see only ignorant and blind optimism because you either can't understand deeper emotional depth, or don't want to.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      also the job he picked is inherently degrading, both socially, and personally.
      He's punishing himself, but the movie never gives foundations for conscious or subconscious punishment.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >Yes, it's perfectly sane to
      >habitually listen to the same ~dozen tapes for multiple decades
      >have a very isolated job and existence in general
      >refuse to reconcile and try to fix your estranged family issues
      >break down in your car crying
      It literally is. You're either autistic or severely stunted/inexperienced from the social/emotional POV since these are frequently part of real life, and experiencing them is much healthier than being a shut-in for instance. He listens to the music he wants, talks to the people he wants and is self-supporting.
      His life is far from "isolated": he chats with people daily. As for "refusing to talk" while working, if you have ever worked you'll have perceived that you're not paid to chat: you're paid to work, and most people prefer to do their jobs with focus instead of distractions.
      The movies shows life as it is-- you're the one fooling yourself by clinging to a vapid idea of "happiness" that social media fools some naive types such as you. But life is the ultimate teacher.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        good luck to you anon

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks but luck doesn't exist, there are random bursts of fate and windfalls that we make good use of as they arise. But life is about actively choosing a constructive mindset because it happens now instead of hypothetical scenarios. Make the best of what you do have available.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >luck doesn't exist,
            >there are random bursts of fate and windfalls that we make good use of as they arise.
            you just obtusely defined luck you pseud

            • 6 days ago
              Anonymous

              >you just obtusely defined luck you pseud
              Wrong because you naively and uneducatedly imply that "luck" is something you can wish for. You have to calm down and make peace with the fact that you're currently both ignorant and too worked up by the naivete of your delusions.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                random bursts of useful fate IS something you can wish for.
                your fatalistic beliefs (or lack of) are irrelevant.
                You are such a pseud, i can't wait for the inevitable
                >merely pretending
                here soon

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                >random bursts of useful fate IS something you can wish for.
                >fate
                >wish for

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                yes, you can wish for a better fate.
                Fatalism as i said is not relevant here.
                You played yourself by validating randomness, which is in direct opposition to fatalism, and thus undermines your argument.

              • 6 days ago
                Anonymous

                That's magical thinking. Wishing as a form of optimism and being ready to make the best use of opportunities is fine, but it can be as deceiving as fatalism because what matters is what is, and what is now.
                Fooling oneself about winning the lottery or being happy WHEN can be a drain on the actual, realistic possibilities that life offers.

  13. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    all right all right there's never a better advocate for these types of films than a passionate articulate Cinemaphile poster dunking on uncomprehending americans. i will now watch your film

  14. 6 days ago
    Anonymous
  15. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I'm always amused by Europeans and Asians talking about how Americans can't appreciate nature when their entire country is urban sprawl walkable city nonsense.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Europe has a social culture of strolling in public parks+squares and taking their offspring to the nearest playground without being swarmed by feral drug addicts etc.
      Japan is heavily forested. What Europeans and Asians have and Americans sometimes lack is a silent, content appreciation for aesthetic details of natural life. Read Sei Shonagon's Pillow Book or some of John Ruskin's writings- they teach people how to enjoy the rewards from the senses that daily living and the natural world offers.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >without being swarmed by feral drug addicts etc

        It baffles me that americans can live like this. I really want to visit that zoo you call LA some day

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          I think Americans are gradually realizing the amount of filth they, the population of richest country on Earth, have been putting up with.
          The Democrat-run American cities have areas (some of them tourist spots such as Hollywood Boulevard/Venice Beach) that currently look, for lack of a better word, subhuman.
          It's reached a point where a backlash can't be far-off, starting with mass deportations, securing the borders and reclaiming cities from drug addicts, homeless weirdos, mentally ill criminals, thugs, drug dealers and so on. It will be like cleaning a polluted river but it can done because it's what most Americans want.

          • 6 days ago
            THE_JEWS_KILLED_JESUS CHRIST

            >It's reached a point where a backlash can't be far-off

            >dat rayciss

            And everyone goes back to living in the decline.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          I think Americans are gradually realizing the amount of filth they, the population of richest country on Earth, have been putting up with.
          The Democrat-run American cities have areas (some of them tourist spots such as Hollywood Boulevard/Venice Beach) that currently look, for lack of a better word, subhuman.
          It's reached a point where a backlash can't be far-off, starting with mass deportations, securing the borders and reclaiming cities from drug addicts, homeless weirdos, mentally ill criminals, thugs, drug dealers and so on. It will be like cleaning a polluted river but it can done because it's what most Americans want.

          Another thing: Central Park is, staggeringly, teeming with fricking rats. As in, dozens of literal rats everywhere. What is said about Paris garbage cans is equally true in NYC, which also has several open sewer spots.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        > Japan is heavily forested. What Europeans and Asians have and Americans sometimes lack is a silent, content appreciation for aesthetic details of natural life.
        This is such a cope coming from a person who has clearly never been to the U.S. Hiking, and outdoor activities are way more popular in the U.S. than in Asia and Europe.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          cosplaying in lululemon and stuffing your holes with protein bars before driving an hour in your SUV to walk 40 minutes by a fricking river is not hiking

  16. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Girls in your little small place in Japan.

  17. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    https://onesixtwo.club/scv/thread/178774.html#179041

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