Do you care about the bitrate of the television & film you watch? What is the optimal bitrate for you?

Do you care about the bitrate of the television & film you watch?
What is the optimal bitrate for you?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Some movies are better watched in shittier quality. Some things were never meant to be seen in HD

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He asked about bit rate, not resolution you fricking moron.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i only watch VHS

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'd only watch VHS versions if I had the choice.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Many cases where the full screen matting on VHS reveals otherwise off frame nipples on DVD. That alone makes VHS worth a view.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Many cases
          name 10

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll give you 2: The Fifth Element has extra Jovovich titty and Titanic has more Winslet titty on VHS.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The first time I watched Halloween was on a terrible quality VHS. Somehow it seemed that much more atmospheric in all its murkiness.

        Seeing it on 4K UHD is a revelation. You can see everything with clarity. It's like turning on the lights. Which doesn't exactly make for a scarier experience.

        As a counterpoint. I was watching an old CinemaScope western the other day on tv in SD, and it really could've used a good remaster in HD or UHD. So much detail lost in the grand sweeping vistas and dramatic landscapes. It would've made the overall film that much more involving.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          first time i saw halloween was on friday the 13th in a movie theater with 13 people on a really worn out print. really added to the experience

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    QxR Tigole rips are the best tradeoff in terms of file size and quality, and the bitrates are generally 8 to 10 mbps iirc. A 2 hour 1080p rip is usually 4 to 5 GB.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      based. i watch their rips on a 4k oled and the difference between that and a remux is negligible. x265 is a miracle compared to x264

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      For me its TIGOLE and its featurettes included

      I used to do my own rips, but anything 5mbps or lower looked like shit (x264)

      I would go for this if I were on a tracker carrying them. As it is I am generally satisfied with half that bitrate, still 10bit hevc.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I would agree with you but I've noticed all their encodes have this shitty film-like grain effect. Idk what it's technically called or what it is but it's in every single one of their 1080p movies...

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Bitrate is high enough to see film grain
        >Must be an issue with the encoding

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Except this is just on their encodes and nothing else. Not even a similar sized and bitrate movie does the same effect.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because most others are shitty encodes. Download the remux and you'll see grain.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        300 was shot on film
        What you're seeing is the compression mushing up the film grain

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yea but this is also on their other encodes not just 300.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            x265 is lossier than x264, finer details will look mushier on x265. Simple as.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, because those others were also shot on film or had grain added in post, like most digital movies do nowadays.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'd add Sartre and HeVK to that list. Other QxR members aren't bad either.

      [...]
      I would go for this if I were on a tracker carrying them. As it is I am generally satisfied with half that bitrate, still 10bit hevc.

      They're literally on 1337x

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For me its TIGOLE and its featurettes included

    I used to do my own rips, but anything 5mbps or lower looked like shit (x264)

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got a 8TB hard drive last year and I've been mostly getting remux of my fav films

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well the one on the right is objectively better so higher bit-rate is a no brainer.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I prefer low, due to slow internet.
    But I also prefer low resolution. And much rather colout depth to pixels. Extreme low res is fine with bicubic upscale, but streaming sites don't allow use of your own player.
    Video should be converted to a higher colour depth regardless, and gamma adjusted lower so near blacks don't show blocking.

    TLDR: Lower res, high bitrate.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    10000kbps for 1080p movies
    40000kbps for 4K

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    for some movies the low quality just adds a certain charm, i tried a higher bitrate version of this movie that looks a lot worse

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Digicuck cope. The closer it looks to a film print with well-defined grain, the better.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >compare these two bitrates
    >two 1080p pics that take up 4/5ths of the width of a 1280x720 image combined

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a mockup slide, you moron. Do you think the clearly visible dogshit quality on the left is actually 1mbps?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why would I think that when I said it was a bad pic?

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I search "movie name 1080p" and then pick the one with the most seeds.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is there such a thing as allowing spike bitrates for "noisy" sequences that get garbled to frick by compression algorithms? Like an underwater shot of someone falling in, surrounded by bubbles, or a storm of rain/leaves streaking/swirling. Does anyone do it for their encodes?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's not often used but I think you're looking for VBR (Variable Bit Rate) instead of the usual CBR (Constant Bit Rate)

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It’s called variable bitrate and yes they all do it, at least all the ones who aren’t moronic.

        I don't know to what extent traditional still image compression and frame-to-frame-change compression combine in video encoding. Is it time-averaged "constant" bit rate or is it truly constant and, per frame, whatever is left over from from the frame delta is budgeted?

        What I really meant by "spike" is the encoder adjusting the maximum specifically for certain periods as I imagine the general case to be setting a variable bit rate to a single moderate maximum that doesn't waste filesize for minimal gain but isn't enough for the standout sequences that still end up looking like shit.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > Is it time-averaged "constant" bit rate or is it truly constant
          Truly constant.
          > is the encoder adjusting the maximum specifically for certain periods
          The maximum is the maximum. The minimum is the minimum. If there are lots of rapid changes it is encoded at the maximum. If things are static, it’s encoded at the minimum. 2 pass is another way to further refine this process at the expense of encoding time.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It’s called variable bitrate and yes they all do it, at least all the ones who aren’t moronic.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's not often used but I think you're looking for VBR (Variable Bit Rate) instead of the usual CBR (Constant Bit Rate)

      It’s called variable bitrate and yes they all do it, at least all the ones who aren’t moronic.

      [...]
      I don't know to what extent traditional still image compression and frame-to-frame-change compression combine in video encoding. Is it time-averaged "constant" bit rate or is it truly constant and, per frame, whatever is left over from from the frame delta is budgeted?

      What I really meant by "spike" is the encoder adjusting the maximum specifically for certain periods as I imagine the general case to be setting a variable bit rate to a single moderate maximum that doesn't waste filesize for minimal gain but isn't enough for the standout sequences that still end up looking like shit.

      > Is it time-averaged "constant" bit rate or is it truly constant
      Truly constant.
      > is the encoder adjusting the maximum specifically for certain periods
      The maximum is the maximum. The minimum is the minimum. If there are lots of rapid changes it is encoded at the maximum. If things are static, it’s encoded at the minimum. 2 pass is another way to further refine this process at the expense of encoding time.

      Is a bitrate curve like this possible? Almost all of the video clamped to an acceptable normal maximum bitrate enough for most scenes but those that really need more get more?

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I can't tell the difference between a 5 GB movie and a 50 GB movie on my OLED TV

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I only care about the tit rate

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I find these minimum settings from my preferred tracker to be very reasonable.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      and for video bitrates:
      SD: 1.5-4 mbs
      720p: 5-7 mbps
      1080p: 8-12 mbps
      4k: 15-25 mbps

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bitrate doesn't matter, the quality of the image does
    if you can use a better codec and get the same or better image quality with a lower bitrate then why would you care?

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not particularly

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >4k: 15-25 mbps
    Why? Untouched 1080p blurays are nearly double this bitrate

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