Easily the most terrifying sopranos character, saying that considering Chrissy does not care about casually butchering someone when asked to.

Easily the most terrifying sopranos character, saying that considering Chrissy does not care about casually butchering someone when asked to.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He's 5'7" lmao

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's a giant among wops

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        OOHHH

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous
        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          EYYY IM JUST BREAKING YA BALLS OVA HERE

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            sar!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So? You think small guys aren't dangerous? They're vicious

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous
      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This depresses me. I will never have big girl GF......

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Just don't tell him to go home and get his shine box.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He’s gonna frick off all over your stupid frickin’ face!

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    richie was way scarier

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He had that look where you were never sure if he's about to go apeshit medieval on your ass or tell you to frick off.
      The only guy he was nice to was Ton

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He had that look where you were never sure if he's about to go apeshit medieval on your ass or tell you to frick off.
      The only guy he was nice to was Ton

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        what's the relevance here?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He has tremendous moxie for his size

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        so is Tuco from breaking bad, both fricking scary

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >richie was way scarier

      Feech was more dangerous, as he wasn't a spaz like Richie.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not the guy you're replying to, but I disagree. One of the first scenes with Feech depicts him as a complete spaz given his recollection of his first few days in prison. He freaks the frick out talking about beating the shit out of some random guy like 20 years ago. He also has regular angry outbursts which clearly piss off everyone else in the crew leading to his retirement.
        I do agree that he was dangerous, but not as dangerous as Richie. The worst he did was break a guys arm, whereas Richie literally ran over a guy and put him in a wheelchair the rest of his life while demanding payments from him. among other atrocities

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I do agree that he was dangerous, but not as dangerous as Richie.

          Both Feech and Ritchie needed to adjust to life back on the outside but Feech could have done it given enough time, whereas Ritchie was pretty much doomed from the start to frick up somehow and either go back to prison or get killed.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I disagree again. Both Feech and Richie were both unable to adjust to life on the outside. This is core to their characterization, their plots, and one of the main messages of the show. The changes in both the people operating in the mob, and the principles those people stood for in context of the newer generation are depicted as overwhelming/impossible to overcome for the old school guys who can't or won't adjust. This ties into an overarching theme of the show which speaks to the degeneration of the mob as compared to the old days. Tony speaks about this himself in one of the first episodes where he says something along the lines of "getting in too late" and that "the best is over." The irony is that he himself is the cause of a lot of the decline due to his actions and principles.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              A lot of the decline is due to career criminals being less successful than most other sectors of the economy, especially if they don't touch drugs
              Mobsters didn't really change, the younger ones do more drugs but aside from that they're the same brand of petty violent criminals as their elders who bemoan the death of the good old days because most people will call the cops when they get extorted now

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I understand your point, and don't necessarily disagree. However, that is clearly NOT the viewpoint of the show's creator and writers. Chase talked very blatantly about the themes of the show highlighting the decline of both the United States and the mafia as related and intertwined with each other. This speaks to a larger societal shift beyond the explanation of the behavior of a few criminals. The younger generation and people within the show are all depicted as more troubled, weaker, less loyal, and ultimately not as 'ideal' as the older generations. Tony and his capos are an example which is confronted when older gangsters come out of jail and struggle to fit into the newer, degenerated operating model of the mafia. You could also use examples of even younger generations, such as Chrissy and to an extend his own son, AJ. Tony kills Chrissy which is in part a recognition that the future of the mafia is ending (referenced in the beginning lines of the show). AJ tries to commit suicide.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Tony and his capos are an example which is confronted when older gangsters come out of jail and struggle to fit into the newer, degenerated operating model of the mafia
                Nah you're misinterpreting that, as well as the parallel decline of the mafia and the US
                Sopranos is basically all about "the gold old days weren't even that good".
                All the old, "noble", "loyal" gangsters getting out of jail are just a bunch of selfish c**ts who act like everything is theirs and apparently didn't understand how they ended up in the can in the first place, because most of the time, the first thing they do is find a way to get back there.
                You can count the exceptions to that pattern on half a hand and those who get into that path want to retire, and fail.
                Anyway, the point is that the mafia in sopranos is a romanticized bunch of low lives morons larping as the actors who play them
                The narrative parallels with the wider history of the US being that the country is basically the same thing, the good old days weren't even that good

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You're wrong, actually. I am not misinterpreting it, as these are the thoughts and feelings of the show's creator, David Chase. Chase has highlighted these parallels himself and even speaks of his personal, pessimistic views on society prior to and during the show which led to these themes. Tony himself is a conduit for Chase when he romanticizes history and the old days. Tony does this ALL the time and its key to his character. Yes, those days weren't PERFECT, but they were BETTER than they are now and the future is in DECLINE. That's basically it.
                I agree that the old gangsters were not perfect, intelligent, or even competent, but they do represent a 'better' set of ideals that cause friction with the newer, worser ones which end up prevailing. It's ultimately very doomer, just like Chase.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Yes, those days weren't PERFECT, but they were BETTER
                The whole show is Tony realizing his dad was a worthless piece of shit and going full cope mode to avoid dealing with the fact that his entire life is a lie, always sucked and probably would have been better if he sold patio furniture.
                David Chase romanticizing the mafia literally only happened in your head. You're completely misinterpreting his point. The Sopranos is not a pessimist show about the decline of the mafia, it's a great depiction of the social dynamics it uses to perpetuate its vain, useless nature and what kind of sick perverts do it. The criminals are not worse today than they were in Tony's dad's generation, they're literally the exact same brand of incompetent, violent morons. There is no decline of the mafia depicted in the show, there is a decline in the ties that used to bind the italian-american population as a community, ties that the mafia used in it's glory days to rip their own people off.
                The show is incredibly explicit in all it's depiction of the mafia: its noble image is a Hollywood fabrication to sell movies that had no basis in reality. The criminals were always criminals, with all that entails about their inexistent moral character. The decline of their influence goes hand in hand with the americanization of the Italian immigrants, their integration into the wider society rendering the mafia not only pointless as a conflict solving authority, but also much worse at it than the government, leaving it with nothing but its predatory nature and a bunch of morons who can't succeed at something else to run it.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Stop prompting ChatGPT and actually respond to me

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I agree. You seem to be trying to argue a different point when the reality is we are both valid. There are multiple themes and correct interpretations of them we can be led to conclude based on the way they are presented to us. This is just another reason The Sopranos, and all great works of art, are awesome.
                t. verification not required

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I also think you have it right. "Bro, the old good times were actually just as shit as rn" is in general a reddit midwit take as well tbch. Old times weren't perfect, but they were certainly better than Tony's times, and there's plenty of indications of this (Feds closing in despite being incompetent, more guys turning and wearing wires, mafia sort of being phased out i.e. coffee shop scene, etc.)

                >Yes, those days weren't PERFECT, but they were BETTER
                The whole show is Tony realizing his dad was a worthless piece of shit and going full cope mode to avoid dealing with the fact that his entire life is a lie, always sucked and probably would have been better if he sold patio furniture.
                David Chase romanticizing the mafia literally only happened in your head. You're completely misinterpreting his point. The Sopranos is not a pessimist show about the decline of the mafia, it's a great depiction of the social dynamics it uses to perpetuate its vain, useless nature and what kind of sick perverts do it. The criminals are not worse today than they were in Tony's dad's generation, they're literally the exact same brand of incompetent, violent morons. There is no decline of the mafia depicted in the show, there is a decline in the ties that used to bind the italian-american population as a community, ties that the mafia used in it's glory days to rip their own people off.
                The show is incredibly explicit in all it's depiction of the mafia: its noble image is a Hollywood fabrication to sell movies that had no basis in reality. The criminals were always criminals, with all that entails about their inexistent moral character. The decline of their influence goes hand in hand with the americanization of the Italian immigrants, their integration into the wider society rendering the mafia not only pointless as a conflict solving authority, but also much worse at it than the government, leaving it with nothing but its predatory nature and a bunch of morons who can't succeed at something else to run it.

                None of this disagrees with what the other poster is saying, which is true "yeah those old days weren't perfect ideal times, but they were demonstrably better, and we certainly have it worse".

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              > I disagree again. Both Feech and Richie were both unable to adjust to life on the outside.

              Sure but it's a question of degree. Feech at least could have worked out a place for himself within the crew, maybe not what he hd hoped for at least he'd make a living whereas Ritchie was a loose cannon from day #1.

              And don't forget, Feech got out of prison after Ritchie and after Tony already had to deal with an old timer push back against the boss.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    played by ROBERT LOGGIA

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      can you spell that?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        ?t=30

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        R as in Robert Loggia.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paulie was the most terrifying with the most pathological potential

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Say what you will but post-Billy's death Phil was the scariest. The way he threatened Chrissy's mom was savage

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >we're from alcoholics anonymous
      Terrifying.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I meant him talking about ramming something up her box

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        HOW DO YOU EVEN COME UP WITH THAT LINE MAN THE WRITERS PEN WAS ON FIRE THAT DAY FOR REAL

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Phil was part of Anonymous, since he does not fogive, he does not forget.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >suddenly decides he's not gonna leave the house anymore and spergs out at his friend and family when they try to get him off Cinemaphile for a sitdown

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It all makes sense now

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Feech was all bravado. That's not the type of guys that you need to be scared off. Now if you said Richie, that'll fit.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ritchie and Paulie were the most terrifying by a large margin.

    Ritchie was an overt and blatant psychopath with a massive ego which was easily offended. He'd gravely injure you, or even kill you for a perceived insult or if you interfered with his perspective on the 'old school' operating methods (see: Beansie), which were actually very hypocritical given his own actions to subvert the rigid hierarchy of the mafia (e.g. disobeying and trying to move against Tony). He is hollow and has no actual principles he lives by other than those that serve his goal to inflict pain and death to others for his own gain exclusively.
    Paulie was a legitimate moron with deep-seated insecurities that consumed him and defined him. He would kill you, even an innocent civilian, for a few bucks (see: his mom's friend he suffocated, an innocent old grandma) or if he found himself in a circumstance he couldn't get out of (beginning of pine barrens episode and reason for its plot). This shit happened often because he is actually moronic and has zero ability to think about his own future or the consequences of his actions. He lives completely in the moment and only knows how to use violence to get what he wants.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone in the Jersey crew except Ralph and maybe the Sopranos had an IQ in the double digits.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ralph, Johnny Sack, and Tony Blundetto are blatantly depicted as the smartest of the gangsters in the show.
      Ralph is "better than nine tenths of your accounts" with numbers and is a top-earner in all of his positions. He is actually smart and able to see through many of the moves made, such as when Tony passes him up for Capo so he can keep better eyes on the targeted crew.
      Johnny Sack is a great strategist who is able to successfully position himself as a key ally for both sides (Jersey and New York families) while being highly influencial.
      Tony Blundetto is most blatanly presented with a 'genius level IQ' in the show, but I don't think they executed this well in the writing or plot. Big missed opportunity, especially given that Buscemi played him.
      >Gigi was also pretty smart but they never developed his character and he was quickly killed off.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Gigi was also pretty smart but they never developed his character and he was quickly killed off.

        Gigi Cestone was the only guy who could have legitimately taken over as boss, his death doomed the Soprano crew as nobody else was competent enough to stand up to NY, except maybe Walden Belfiore but he was too young.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think that's an interesting theory but a bit of a stretch. Can you provide additional reasoning for your conclusion? Gigi was depicted as smart, but unable to handle a crew that didn't like him, which led to stress that killed him from a fricking bowel movement. I think Tony, in such a scenario, would have been able to overcome it successfully. Tony already overcame attrition from his own crew and rivals that were much more difficult than the scenario Gigi found himself in.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Can you provide additional reasoning for your conclusion?

            Gigi was a smart common sense kinda guy and sure, running a crew is stressful (we see the strain on Tony throughout the series and earlier, on Jackie Aprile) but the heat attack was just bad luck, not something directly attributed to his situation.

            Everybody else in the Soprano crew had some kinda debilitating personality problem that prevented them from being able to step up if needed.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You have provided no evidence for your suggestion that Gigi was highly intelligent or capable. My point still stands: he died from stress of running a single crew. The presentation of his character is one of being weak and incapable of leading. Tony is running a whole 'family' (arguably, we know that New York doesn't view them as a real family).

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >You have provided no evidence for your suggestion that Gigi was highly intelligent or capable.

                The evidence was his character on the show, he was the only one who wasn't a dumbass or had personality problems.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Okay, so where are the examples and evidence you can provide that support your conclusion? You're being incredibly vague and starting to sound stupid. He was depicted as a mid-level leader who couldn't cope with the stress which led to his untimely and early death. Prove me wrong if you can.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >the heat attack was just bad luck, not something directly attributed to his situation
              There's a clear heightening of the ongoing situation, problems created, and stress of the situation culminating in his death. He fricked up the Mustang Sally hit. He seems competent because he doesn't act like a total dago moron but he messed up or didn't take care of anything he was supposed to as Capo

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What did gigi do that was so wicked smaht?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Carmine was the smartest gangster on the show.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I disagree and would ask you to put forth additional reasoning and evidence. You could actually say Carmine Senior is very dumb, given that his son is often referenced as a fricking moron. The implication being that Carmine Junior had to get those genes/behaviors from somewhere: his dad.
          Yes, Carmine was the leader of the mob, that doesn't necessarily mean he is/was smart. There is little in the show to suggest he is intelligent. If anything, he was more politically savvy so maybe had a higher EQ.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Carmine Jr.'s moves were all made with the goal of burning the whole house down behind him and leaving with his dad's money. That's why he always manages to say the most wrong thing at the most wrong time.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            He didn’t end up getting killed or going to prison. Dying old and of natural causes is almost impossible for a gangster (as Tony admits) and he manages to do it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Tony Blundetto is most blatanly presented with a 'genius level IQ' in the show
        That was just Tony being moronic

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Tony, Jackie Senior, Silvio, Ralph. Basically all the top guys and best earners overseeing unions and construction. Meanwhile Chrissy, Paulie, Eugene, Patsy, Pussy, Bobby, Ritchie, Feech, etc. were doing Mickey mouse scores, small time shakedowns, betting and small time drug dealing

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Robert Loggia is too corny, sorry
    Heard him in too many shitty movies, cartoons, and videogames. burned all his mystique

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it's impossible to take italians seriously, they're the comic relief of humanity

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

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