ITT: Notoriously troubled productions

>Wes Craven's CURSED was 90% reshot after producer Bob Weinstein decided that the original cut was too slow and dark rather than the SCREAM-like horror comedy he expected. Supporting characters Skeet Ulrich, Mandy Moore, Scott Foley, Omar Epps, Illeana Douglas, John C. McGinley, James Brolin, Robert Forster, Corey Feldman and Heather Langenkamp had their roles cut, with Moore, Foley and Douglas being replaced by Mya, Michael Rosenbaum and Portia De Rossi, while Ulrich, Epps, McGinley, Forster, Brolin, Feldman and Langenkamp were axed entirely. These reshoots turned protagonists Christina Ricci and Jesse Eisenberg from strangers into siblings, and added a new character played by Joshua Jackson.

>Weinstein was still unhappy with the new version and demanded an additional round of reshoots to add a new ending more similar to SCREAM, in which Jackson turns out to be the villain, while in the previous reshoots he was a tragic figure. He then ordered the movie heavily edited down as he wanted it to be no longer than 90 minutes, and, fearing it would recoup its budget due to the reshoots, had it edited down from R to PG-13 to reach a wider audience.

>The movie was a colossal critical and commercial flop that wrecked Ricci's career as a leading woman and convinced Craven to never direct solely for money again.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Weinstein is an idiot is not breaking news and Alien 3 was another example of over zealous producers fricking everything up

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's the point of Wes Craven directing a movie if in the end he's going to become the producer's b***h?

      >I don't have time for that! It's Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson working together. It worked for Scream, just do that again, but with werewolves!
      - Bob Weinstein, probably.

      Despite Wes' reputation as a top tier horror director, he was inconsistent and didn't always have great judgement. Same with Tobe Hooper and Romero.

      This isn't even the first time Wes got screwed over by producer's.

      >Director Wes Craven and screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin's original vision for the film was a PG-rated supernatural science fiction thriller, with the primary focus being on the macabre love story between Paul and Samantha, as well as a secondary focus on the adults around them and how they are truly monsters inside themselves. Craven filmed this version of the film and Warner Bros. decided to screen it to a test audience mostly consisting of Craven's fans. The response from fans was negative, criticizing the lack of violence and gore seen in Craven's previous films. The studio eventually discovered Craven's popularity as a horror film director. The president of Warner Bros. at the time, Mark Canton, demanded Rubin write six additional gore scenes into his script, each bloodier than the last. Rubin worked very hard with Craven to create a very deep and heartfelt movie out of it. Unfortunately, added gore scenes, re-shoots and post production re-editing of the movie heavily changed the original story. Craven and Rubin expressed strong anger at the studio and thus disowned the film.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Wes Craven once said regarding the reasons why re-shoots and adding more graphic death scenes into the film were demanded by the studio: "We started off doing a picture that Warner Bros. indicated they wanted to do, a macabre love story with a twist. About five weeks into the shoot, they realized who I was and told me not to be inhibited by what they had told me in the past... So, in the last weeks of shooting, I made up one little nightmare scene and put it into the film. It was the big hit of the screening. So, then, they came to me and said, 'Listen, what we need is more of that stuff. What we're doing is adding to the deaths of few people, a jump for the beginning, a new closing scene and two nightmares - that sort of Wes Craven touch'." After negative reactions from preview audiences that saw Craven's first cut of the film and wanted a much more grisly film, it was re-edited and the gorier deaths and all of the other re-shot scenes were included, but these scenes only made the film look like a mash-up of two different genres: a family-friendly film and a straight-up horror film. While new scenes were added, others like more scenes between Paul and Samantha that would have made the movie more of a love story as originally intended were deleted for pacing and length because it was decided that the movie was to be released as a fast-paced horror film.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The studio eventually discovered Craven's popularity as a horror film director.

        are they moronic? how do you work in film and miss something like this lmao

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I was thinking about them. In the end it seems to me that studio executives don't really watch movies.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Seriously. I give zero fricks about schlock horror and even I know that dude’s been a household name for decades, even more so back then.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why are you sucking that one anon's wiener though?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Before Deadly Friend Craven had just directed two episodes of Disneyland show. I can only reason some executive saw those but was clueless about his huge success with horror...

          Imagine if they'd found he did porn before horror.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I always kind of liked Alien 3. After learning what it went through during production, I think it’s exceptionally good.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I remember watching it as a kid and being angry that Newt and Hicks died. That really pissed me off because of how unearned and wrong it felt.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I watched it as a kid too and it just made me sad. But the whole movie is sad. It’s set on a planetary penal colony

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Werewolf looked great though

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why not just read the script first before telling them to make the movie

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I don't have time for that! It's Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson working together. It worked for Scream, just do that again, but with werewolves!
      - Bob Weinstein, probably.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's the point of Wes Craven directing a movie if in the end he's going to become the producer's b***h?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      all directors are producers' b***hes. the only one that even comes close to not being one was kubrick, but even he had his film cut posthumously.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Despite Wes' reputation as a top tier horror director, he was inconsistent and didn't always have great judgement. Same with Tobe Hooper and Romero.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yikes

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone know what was written in the original script?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://bloody-disgusting.com/editorials/3623003/release-craven-cut-history-wes-cravens-troubled-werewolf-film-cursed/

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Mandy Moore is the opening kill.
      >Ricci and Ulrich get into a car crash. Eisenberg stops to help them and they are all attacked and cursed by a werewolf.
      >Most of the movie is them coming to terms with the fact.
      >Foley was Ricci's ex-boyfriend (later reinvented as her annoying co-worker).
      >McGinley was Eisenberg's abusive father.
      >Brolin was Ulrich's disappointed father.
      >Forster was Ricci's boss.
      >Epps was an animal control officer.
      >Feldman was one of Ricci's co-workers.
      >Langenkamp was a reporter.
      >Ricci and Ulrich develop a romance.
      >It transpires that Scott Baio (as himself) is a werewolf, but he isn't the killer as he's just too incompetent.
      >The true killer is Baio's assistant and Ricci's put-upon co-worker Judy Greer.
      >Greer massacres most of the cast during the opening a new nightclub/museum, Ricci ultimately kills her, freeing herself, Ulrich and Eisenberg from the curse.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > Scott Baio (as himself) is a werewolf, but he isn't the killer as he's just too incompetent
        That’s actually really funny

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I do find it interesting when the studio takes over a film and it ends up bombing hard films Lynch Dune.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >promise John Carpenter a 90 million budget
    >only give 30 million at the last second
    It's a miracle Vampires was as good as it was. It could've been great if the studio wasn't stingy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've never seen more than the opening vampire scene, I find it boring and I don't buy James Woods as a butt-buster guy

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yeah this, Woods was shit in that

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I've never seen more than the opening vampire scene, I find it boring and I don't buy James Woods as a butt-buster guy

          >promise John Carpenter a 90 million budget
          >only give 30 million at the last second
          It's a miracle Vampires was as good as it was. It could've been great if the studio wasn't stingy.

          He was good I suggest you rewatch.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Yes Ivan we know you're raiding.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's not even a Boris. It's a fricking Ahmed or Rajneesh.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Freddy vs Jason movie also went through hell during its development

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Walter Hill gets carte blanche to do whatever he wants.
    >Decides to do an musical action film with all the stuff he thought was cool as a child.
    >Declines to make it R as he wishes for kids like he was to be able to watch it.
    >Declines to shoot in the real Chicago, they build an entire prop city in the studio lot.
    >Tom Cruise unavailable for the lead role, producers suggest Patrick Swayze but Hill is set on Michael Paré.
    >Paré is still inexperienced, has little chemistry with love interest Diane Lane, and gets bullied by Rick fricking Moranis.
    >Final concert scene is shot with Lane singing Springsteen's "Streets of Fire."
    >Springsteen refuses to sign over the rights because they won't use his vocals, so they have to rebuild the entire set and film a whole new ending with a new original song by Jim Steinman.
    >Movie gets a PG rating as PG-13 didn't exist yet, so they must remove the more graphic scenes including the lead villain's death.
    >Without it, the protagonist's tragic departure to protect his love interest from his violent lifestyle makes no sense because no one died.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Walter Hill's filmography is solid

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Walter hill is a dumb hack. Keep up grandpa.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And it's still kino.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Movie gets a PG rating as PG-13 didn't exist yet, so they must remove the more graphic scenes including the lead villain's death.
      how the frick does that work? If the original cut was graphic why wasn't it just rated R?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >including the lead villain's death.
      I'm okay with this. Them settling everything with some cheesy fight totally fits with the vibe of it being a teenage kid's rock and roll fantasy.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This, I thought the steinman songs were pretty solid and he wrote bat out of hell as basically a rock opera and the streets of fire is one of the movies that come close to that sort of thing

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The Island of Dr. Moreau

    >David Thewlis has stated that he would like to give a real account of the film's production, but fears that if he did he would never work again.

    >When David Thewlis arrived onset, Marlon Brando said to him, "Go home, David. This is not a good film to work on. It's cursed".

    >Val Kilmer described the shoot as "crazy". Marlon Brando was still recovering from his daughter's suicide. The day production started, the French government set off an underwater atomic bomb near Tahiti, where Brando owned an atoll. Kilmer turned on the TV and learned that he was getting divorced. Two days later, the studio fired director Richard Stanley due to their concerns over the film's direction. John Frankenheimer who was hired to replace Stanley, clashed with Brando, Kilmer, and studio executives from the start about the film's direction.

    >Richard Stanley had spent four years developing the project, only to be fired after four days.

    >According to rumor, after the studio fired original director Richard Stanley, he convinced the makeup crew to turn him into one of the background mutants, so he could keep tabs on the making of his dream project. He supposedly did not unmask himself until the wrap party.

    >Actors playing Moreau's creations would spend hours in makeup, only to find out that they weren't needed. At one point, a day's filming was canceled when Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer each refused to come out of their trailer until the other did.

    >Location shooting, scheduled for six weeks, stretched to almost six months. The atmosphere on the set became a mirror of the movie plot, with the long-suffering cast and crew becoming more and more alienated by and hostile toward the megalomaniacal co-stars and their tyrannical director.

    >Marlon Brando routinely spent hours in his air-conditioned trailer when he was supposed to be on camera, while actors and extras sweltered in the tropical heat in full make-up and heavy costumes.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Marlon Brando wore a small radio receiver to help him remember his lines. Co-star David Thewlis claimed "He'd be in the middle of a scene and suddenly he'd be picking up police messages and Marlon would repeat, 'There's a robbery at Woolworths'."

      >According to David Thewlis, Marlon Brando described making the film as like trying to complete a crossword puzzle while falling down an elevator shaft.

      >Val Kilmer frustrated director John Frankenheimer so much that, after shooting Kilmer's last scene in the movie, Frankenheimer allegedly said, "Cut! Now get that bastard off my set."

      >Location shooting, scheduled for six weeks, stretched to almost six months. The atmosphere on the set became a mirror of the movie plot, with the long-suffering cast and crew becoming more and more alienated by and hostile toward the megalomaniacal co-stars and their tyrannical director.

      >When John Frankenheimer demanded more extras, some homeless hippies living in the nearby rainforest were brought in.

      >It was Marlon Brando's idea for Doctor Moreau to wear an ice-bucket on his head in one scene. He came up with the idea because of boredom and the heat. Everyone was too afraid to ask him to remove it. Brando, explaining the idea to John Frankenheimer, said Moreau had secretly mutated himself into a Dolphin Man, the bucket was to cover up a blow-hole in the center of his head, and the ice being poured in was to keep him hydrated.

      >Ron Perlman accepted his role so he could star with his idol Marlon Brando. He was originally scheduled to shoot for three weeks and ended up staying for four and a half months when several of Val Kilmer's original lines were given to his character.

      >It was Marlon Brando's idea for Doctor Moreau to resemble The Pope, as he felt that he was blaspheming against nature.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >John Frankenheimer assigned Ron Hutchinson to rewrite the film, leaving everybody in the dark. Pages were turned in a few days before they were shot. David Thewlis said, "We would get pages and pages every day, and you'd read them and think, 'Well, these are shit as well.' We all had different ideas of where it should go. I even ended up improvising some of the main scenes with Marlon." Thewlis also rewrote his character.

        >Richard Stanley was offered his full fee if he left the production quietly and did not speak about his sacking. His disappearance caused consternation at New Line, who feared he might try to sabotage the film. It also sent shock waves through the cast and crew. An outraged Fairuza Balk stormed off the set after a heated exchange with the New Line executives, then reportedly had a production assistant drive her 2500 km Cairns to Sydney in a rented limousine. By her own account, Balk's agent warned her bluntly that the studio would ruin her, and that she would never work in films again if she broke her contract, so she soon returned to the set.

        >Val Kilmer showed up on set two days late. He hadn't learned his lines, and knew nothing about his character. Kilmer blamed his behavior on learning from a TV report that his then-wife, Joanne Whalley, had filed for divorce. Many of the cast and crew have testified to Kilmer's bullying, hostility, and bad behavior in the first days of shooting. He wouldn't deliver the dialogue as scripted, and repeatedly criticized Stanley's ideas. The footage shot was deemed unusable.

        >Richard Stanley claimed that the only good footage shot during his time as director was shot from a helicopter. Further events led to continuity problems, which made this footage unusable.

        >The actors playing Doctor Moreau's children spent most of their downtime engaging in alcohol, sex, drugs, and general debauchery.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >In an interview with Sex & Guts Magazine, Richard Stanley said, "When I left the production, I shredded every document I had. But the mushroom trip wasn't true. I wish it was. I've heard stories over time that I'd freaked out, that I shouted at so and so, that I punched so and so. But point of fact, what I did at the time was staying in the same chair for about two days, while continously smoking and taking telephone calls. During that time, over that 48 hour period, I shredded every single goddamn document from the last two years. I made certain at that point in time, that there were no telephone numbers, there were no timetables, no rainfall charts, anything that they had figured out about the location, so that they would have to figure it out from scratch. It wasn't really sabotage, it was to leave as little trace behind of my cooperation as possible. A stalling tactic, in a way. Have them to suss out the whole thing from scratch."

          >Marco Hofschneider's part was originally much bigger. His role was cut down because Val Kilmer didn't want to be upstaged by him. Then Marlon Brando became obsessed with Nelson de la Rosa, the world's smallest man, and insisted the script be revised. Some of Hofschneider's scenes were given to De La Rosa.

          >Nelson de la Rosa acted up onset, lashing out physically at Marco Hofschneider, and using his sister to translate pick-up lines to the female extras who described him as "very sexual."

          >Due to Marlon Brando's infamous large appetite and dislike of Val Kilmer on set, he would request and eat large amounts of cabbage an hour before a scene started and would silently fart on purpose numerous times to leave what was described a "foul stench" that would annoy Kilmer.

          >When Richard Stanley met Marlon Brando, New Line insisted on sending a female executive to document it. At his house, Brando turned up the air conditioning until she fell asleep, then he and Stanley discussed the film.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Richard Stanley consulted a warlock in London for advice on the film, such as casting Marlon Brando. When he died, the production went downhill.

            >The production was hit by a hurricane.

            >During filming, David Thewlis fell off a horse and broke his leg.

            >Val Kilmer burned a crewmember in the face with his cigarette.

            >John Frankenheimer kept Zbigniew Preisner on as composer, and he completed a score. After the previews, Preisner was told that the music was "fantastic" but was then asked to write something different. Preisner walked away from the film and from Hollywood.

            >As one of the last of the "old style" Hollwood directors, John Frankenheimer's gruff, dictatorial approach was radically different from Richard Stanley's. He soon alienated many of the cast, especially the Australian crew.

            >Marlon Brando ate lots of pizzas in his van during the production. He also became obsessed with dwarf actor Nelson de la Rosa, asking for scenes together when he hugged him in his arms.

            >Last-minute script changes resulted in characters designed for nighttime scenes being filmed in broad daylight, or characters designed with one action in mind suddenly being asked to do something entirely different.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >The screenplay underwent several rewrites. Richard Stanley wrote the first draft of the screenplay, and Michael Herr wrote a second draft. When John Frankenheimer was brought in as director, he wanted his own script. So the producers brought in Walon Green to do a rewrite. John started filming from Green's script version but decided he wanted more emphasis on certain aspects. For this reason, Ron Hutchinson was brought in to do rewrites.

              >The studio had designed a baboon character specifically for the Australian actor who had been cast in the role, a very small, wiry man with a thin face. The actor was mugged in Sydney shortly after the shoot started, leaving him with a broken leg, John Frankenheimer put behaviorist Peter Elliott into the role. "They didn't want to deal with casting a new person who looked like the original guy," Shane Mahan said, "and Peter was there already. So it was just, 'Let Peter do the baboon guy.' Elliott was quite stocky, with a broader face. So we had to stretch and kluge our original baboon makeup to try to make it fit him, and it never looked right. That was really disappointing. We had always been such perfectionists - we weren't in the habit of throwing a makeup together on somebody in that way."

              >It was Marlon Brando's idea for Doctor Moreau's chair to have peawiener feathers on it. The art director managed to get them from a peawiener at a nearby farm.

              >For a scene in which a dead beast-woman gives birth to a mutant baby, Joey Orosco had sculpted a non-articulated silicone form. Just prior to shooting the scene, John Frankenheimer decided he wanted the woman to be alive and convulsing throughout. Shane Mahan and his team had only minutes to mechanize the prop, adding rods to joints and installing bladders under the skin, all on the fly.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Damn

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Due to Marlon Brando's infamous large appetite and dislike of Val Kilmer on set, he would request and eat large amounts of cabbage an hour before a scene started and would silently fart on purpose numerous times to leave what was described a "foul stench" that would annoy Kilmer.

            >When Richard Stanley met Marlon Brando, New Line insisted on sending a female executive to document it. At his house, Brando turned up the air conditioning until she fell asleep, then he and Stanley discussed the film.

            Top kek

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >>When Richard Stanley met Marlon Brando, New Line insisted on sending a female executive to document it. At his house, Brando turned up the air conditioning until she fell asleep, then he and Stanley discussed the film.
            lol

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >>When Richard Stanley met Marlon Brando, New Line insisted on sending a female executive to document it. At his house, Brando turned up the air conditioning until she fell asleep, then he and Stanley discussed the film.
            I forgive him if everything.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >When Richard Stanley met Marlon Brando, New Line insisted on sending a female executive to document it. At his house, Brando turned up the air conditioning until she fell asleep, then he and Stanley discussed the film.

            Epicly based.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I love Marlon Brando so fricking much.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >police messages and Marlon would repeat, 'There's a robbery at Woolworths'.
        LOL

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Brando, explaining the idea to John Frankenheimer, said Moreau had secretly mutated himself into a Dolphin Man, the bucket was to cover up a blow-hole in the center of his head, and the ice being poured in was to keep him hydrated.
        Give this man a writer's credit!

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm sure israeli studio interference has ruined countless bad movies that would have been decent otherwise.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Alien 3

    >First-time director David Fincher disowned the film, stating in an interview with the Guardian: "I had to work on it for two years, got fired off it three times and I had to fight for every single thing. No one hated it more than me; to this day, no one hates it more than me". He cited constant studio interference during production, and actually walked out when the studio rejected his initial cut and ordered extensive re-shoots. He was not involved in the final cut, but his initial rough cut later became the basis for the 'Assembly Cut', a longer version of the movie released on DVD in 2003, and on Blu-ray in 2010. Although Fincher was asked to work on this Assembly Cut, he considered it but eventually decided against it, giving supervising producer Charles de Lauzirika his blessing as long as it was not called a 'Director's cut'. With regards to the new version itself, he stated that he has no comments on it, as he has never seen it.

    >Director David Fincher later stated that the constant studio interference made the film stray so far from his vision, that the only way to make a 'director's cut' would be to burn the entire negative, and start over. He also admitted that when the 1992 L.A. riots started to get close to the lab where the film's negatives had been developed and stored, he hoped that the entire building would burn to the ground, and the film with it.

    >Original Alien (1979) director Ridley Scott turned down the chance to direct. Scott and later Renny Harlin both thought the third film should explore the origin of the Xenomorph species. This concept was deemed too expensive by David Giler and Walter Hill, since most special effects work at the time still had to be done practically instead of by computer-generated images, so Scott declined to return and Harlin later quit the film because he found alternative concepts too repetitive. Scott ultimately got his wish with the movies Prometheus (2012) and Alien: Covenant (2017).

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Vincent Ward and John Fasano wrote many drafts of a script where Ripley crash-lands on a "wooden planet", which is essentially an artificial wooden planetoid housing a giant monastery inhabited by monks. Ward was also set to direct, and 20th Century Fox quickly green-lit production based on their concept (and because Sigourney Weaver's salary came with a deadline start date). Around 1/5 of the planned budget had already been spent on sets while Ward was still writing new treatments with additional set pieces, but Fox, Weaver and the producers felt that Ripley's story remained underdeveloped, and started to doubt the plausibility of this wooden planet. With a fixed release date, mounting pre-production costs and several recent Fox movies like Die Hard 2 (1990) and The Abyss (1989) having gone over budget, the studio told Ward to rein in his ambitious plans and remove several set pieces to cut costs and save time. After butting heads with executives (he was reportedly made to wait on a bench outside during one tense boardroom meeting), Ward left the project, citing 'creative differences' as the main reason. Screenwriter Rex Pickett, who was married to Ward's assistant and later brought in for re-writes, added in 2022 that the studio had long tolerated Ward's erratic creative process, believing that there was some 'method to his madness'. The final straw, however, was Ward's alleged cocaine use, which caused him to completely lose control of the project; when the studio learned that Ward had no idea what he was doing due to the drug abuse, he was fired the next day, making way for David Fincher as the new director.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >William Gibson wrote one of the first script treatments for the film, based on an idea from producers David Giler and Walter Hill, which was initially intended as the first of a two-parter, to be shot back-to-back. As Sigourney Weaver's return was in question, Ripley would spend most of the time in a coma. The main focus of the story was on Hicks and Bishop from Aliens (1986) who are brought to a deep space station where scientists have begun experimenting on Alien cell samples, with devastating consequences. When a dangerous Alien-human hybrid gets loose inside the station, Hicks launches the unconscious Ripley in a lifeboat safely into space (setting up the fourth movie) before he and Bishop lead a group of young Colonial Marines to evacuate of the station. The first version was action-packed, and included a battle between the marines and a horde of Aliens in a Queen's nest, and one on the station's outer hull. Because this was too expensive to produce, the second draft removed most action scenes and substituted the marines for civilian survivors. Many consider this to be a much superior script. However, Giler and Hill had hoped for more inventive ideas, and wanted another draft. Gibson refused, citing other commitments and his frustration with "foot dragging on the producers' part." Giler and Hill then canceled the second part, focusing on one movie instead. The only carry-over from this original script is the bar-codes on the back of the convicts' necks, a relative lack of weapons on the station, and the appearance of the Company scientists.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Director David Fincher didn't like the final script written by producers Walter Hill and David Giler, and they fought bitterly over it for two months. As production was postponed from November 1990 until January 1991, Giler and Hill took a Christmas holiday, and Fincher, who had secretly discussed their script with writer Rex Pickett, brought him in for a complete four-week re-write. The studio liked Fincher and Pickett's script, and sided with them, much to Giler and Hill's anger, who furiously withdrew from London's Pinewood Studios and ran production from their office in the USA, leaving line producer Ezra Swerdlow to oversee the project. This left Fincher and Pickett to finish the script themselves, although Giler and Hill later forced Pickett out and went back to their own script. During one particularly tense conference call with 20th Century Fox over the ending, the studio again sided with Fincher, causing Giler to scoff at them for "listening to a shoe salesman" (referring to a Nike commercial that Fincher had directed) while Fincher complained about their budgetary restrictions. Giler and Hill finally withdrew from production completely, only returning during post-production. Fincher would end up rewriting lines and entire scenes on-the-fly during filming, while trying to keep Fox (who were requesting daily updates from the set) at bay.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >After William Gibson's and Eric Red's screenplays were rejected, David Twohy was next to contribute to the pile of abandoned scripts that the movie's pre-production generated. His story took place many years after Aliens (1986), and started with the Company discovering a facehugger preserved in amber. Like in Gibson and Red's versions, it involved subsequent experiments in genetically engineering Aliens as bioweapons. It introduced a high-security prison facility/ore refinery called Moloch Island in orbit around Earth, populated by a newly arrived prisoner called Styles and a group of morally ambiguous inmates (one of whom is an escape artist). When they find out that the Company is breeding Aliens on the station and uses its death row inmates as bait to study the creatures, the inmates try to break out; however, an accident allows the Aliens to escape as well, and infest the station. In the first draft, Ellen Ripley was only referenced once when a computer monitor showed her picture and listed her as deceased, but Twohy supposedly also worked on a draft that included her character in case Sigourney Weaver could be coaxed back to reprise her role. His screenplay was discarded when Vincent Ward came aboard as director and disliked the prison idea, but some of Twohy's elements made it into the finished product, as well as his own Pitch Black (2000).

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Renny Harlin was the first to be attached as director. He wanted to avoid a re-tread of the first two installments by situating the movie on the Alien homeworld. However, due to prohibitive costs, the studio remained in favor of stories that took place in enclosed buildings and space ships. Their inability to agree on a story and endless delays in production caused him to direct Die Hard 2 (1990) for 20th Century Fox instead. Then Vincent Ward was suggested on the strength of The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey (1988), but his directorial duties only lasted a few months before he walked away after several disagreements with the producers and studio; ironically, one of the issues was that the studio wanted to scale back his vision due to budget overruns on Harlin's Die Hard 2. Stephen Hopkins was another proposed candidate after shooting A Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dream Child (1989) and Predator 2 (1990) almost back-to-back, but he was temporarily done with directing installments in existing horror/sci-fi franchises, and passed on the opportunity. Scriptwriter Walter Hill was then considered to direct the film, but he stepped down after David Fincher became available.

            >There are screenplay treatments by Eric Red, David Twohy, John Fasano and Rex Pickett all freely available on the Internet.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >No less than 10 writers and two directors were involved in the scripting phase, with Fox Studios reportedly spending a total of $13 million on numerous screenplay drafts. David Twohy, Vincent Ward, John Fasano, Renny Harlin, David Fincher, Larry Ferguson, David Giler and Walter Hill all attempted to claim credit for the screenplay during the arbitration process, with only Giler, Hill and Ferguson receiving it (despite very few of Ferguson's contributions making the final screenplay). Four more writers could have claimed credit but chose not to; William Gibson and Eric Red saw no point in doing so, since the film had changed substantially from their early drafts; Greg Pruss was talked out of claiming credit in exchange for guaranteed work elsewhere; and Rex Pickett, despite having written a substantial amount of the shooting script, declined to seek credit due to how unpleasant his experience of working with the producers on the film had been.

              >When David Fincher was brought on as director, the movie was running behind schedule, the script was still incomplete and roles still hadn't been cast, but a major set had already been constructed: a monastery, part of the original location, a huge medieval complex on an artificial planetoid constructed largely from wood. The studio felt that the set became too costly, and Fincher didn't like the concept, reportedly saying that Alien is "all about dirt and filth and oil and a hardcore technical world", and wondering why the studio still bothered with this "wooden thing". The setting was changed to a prison, with the monastery used as a church inside the facility.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >After William Gibson's script was rejected and Ridley Scott passed on the chance to return, Eric Red wrote a screenplay for the new director, Renny Harlin. It starts with a group of soldiers boarding the drifting Sulaco, where they find out that all of the survivors from Aliens (1986) are dead: only ruined cryotubes, shreds of flesh and Ripley's bloody name tag are found, before a single Alien suddenly attacks the platoon. One of the soldiers, Sam Smith, later wakes up with amnesia and a mechanical arm aboard his home, a fifty-story space station called North Star, with a surface modeled on 20th-century rural Kansas, featuring open wheat fields, farms and a small town, and a high-tech research facility below. Trying to find out what has happened to him, Sam learns that a scientist named Doctor Rand is experimenting with Alien DNA, and has turned it into a mutagen that creates hybrids of Alien tissue with creatures, humans and even inanimate material. Several hybrids escape, multiply and decimate the population, forcing the remaining townspeople to defend themselves from hordes of invading Aliens. At one point, fifty Alien-human hybrids fuse together to form one big amorphous creature; it tears through the station, mutating its flesh and steel and fusing them into one colossal biomechanical creature, which even chases a shuttle with escaping survivors.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >While unused Alien 3 screenplays by William Gibson, Vincent Ward and David Twohy have gained significant cult following over the years, Red's version has been widely ridiculed for its poor writing, B-horror movie tone (featuring Alien versions of dogs, cats, pigs, chickens, and even a mosquito), copious amounts of gore (including explicit mauling, explosive decompression and an Alien death by chainsaw) and even a graphic, gratuitous zero-gravity sex scene. Harlin reportedly quit after he read it; Sigourney Weaver called it "a real disaster, absolutely dreadful", and Red himself disowned it as a "piece of junk" that he wrote after "five weeks of intense, hysterical story conferences with the studio" who just wanted to rush a sequel into production. He also blamed producers Walter Hill and David Giler for giving him "no story or treatment or any real plan for the picture", and hampering his efforts by not wanting Weaver to return.

                >The original screenplay by Vincent Ward and John Fasano contained a scene in a latrine where the Alien was lurking in the space beneath the toilet seats, and would pull unsuspecting victims through the hole. Ward felt it would be both gruesome and funny. There were also scenes where Ripley would start to feel immense survivors' guilt, causing her to hallucinate and see several of her deceased friends and colleagues from the previous movies.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >In a 2022 interview, screenwriter Rex Pickett gave additional insight into the movie's troubled pre-production. His then-wife Barbara Schock was assistant to the original writer/director Vincent Ward, who had written a treatment where Ripley crashes on a wooden planet populated by monks, on which the movie was green-lit. Schock reported back to Fox Studios on Ward's progress, and secretly shared several of his screenplay drafts with Pickett, which he all characterized as "terrible" (and the premise as "ludicrous"). When Schock found out that Ward was out of control and constantly using cocaine, the studio fired him. Larry Ferguson was brought in to re-write the screenplay with Ward's replacement David Fincher, who had the premise changed to prisoners in a penal colony.

                >However, when Ferguson's contributions were rejected, producers David Giler and Walter Hill stepped in as writers on Sigourney Weaver's insistence (who had script approval). This caused constant power struggles with Fincher, who technically worked for them but didn't just meekly accept their contributions. Pickett described the Giler and Hill's script as "amateurish [without making] narrative sense". In a personal memo to Fincher, he called them "hacks" who cared little for the film and were only in it for their fee; Giler reportedly spent most of his time drunk and talking about his experiences with prostitutes in Thailand, while Hill just farmed out the writing of the action scenes to Schock (now both Hill's and Fincher's assistant), based on Fincher's storyboards; as for dialogue, he would simply pull lines from whatever shows were on TV at the time. Schock ultimately convinced Fincher to have Pickett brought over to London and do a 9-day rewrite in total secrecy, adding story, conflict and character motivation while keeping the action sequences for which sets were already being built.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >After Fincher presented Pickett's new version to Fox, they were impressed enough to hire Pickett to officially re-write the script more thoroughly with Fincher's input. A month later, Fincher, Pickett and even the studio were happy with the newly finished screenplay, which was about to go into production when Hill stormed into Fincher's office, tore Pickett's script to shreds and informed him that he would be filming his and Giler's script: through a disgruntled former line producer, Hill had learned of Pickett's memo and his low opinion of him, so he decided to pull a power move by getting Weaver (who still felt loyal to him for producing the first two movies) to side with him, threatening to leave production unless Hill's demands were met; Pickett never met Weaver, and was sure that his script was never given to her. He and Schock were fired from the film, so Fincher had no choice but to work with Hill and Giler's script, which was eventually re-written to incorporate some elements from Pickett's screenplay.

                >At one point, David Fincher was denied permission by the film's producers to shoot a crucial scene in the infirmary between Ripley and the Alien, where the latter menacingly closes in on Ripley. Against orders, Fincher grabbed Sigourney Weaver, a camera and shot the scene anyway. This scene not only appears in the final cut, but also featured prominently in trailers, and many regard it as the movie's most iconic shot.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >$7 million had been spent on sets that were never used thanks to the ever-changing script, before filming had even started. With a deadline looming and the studio getting anxious to get things back under their control, they would call writer Rex Pickett almost daily with constant demands for changes. It got to the point that whenever director David Fincher wanted to discuss Pickett's progress on the script, he would let the phone ring twice, hang up and call again, so that Pickett knew it was Fincher and not the studio harassing him. Even throughout filming, the script was constantly being re-written, with new versions faxed to the studio on a near-daily basis. Cast and crew often filmed a scene, and learned the next day that it had already been scrapped.

                >While off set, Sigourney Weaver had to wear a wig as her then two-year-old daughter Charlotte didn't like to see her mother bald.

                >Making the convicts bald-headed due to a lice problem was David Fincher's idea. When he proposed this to Sigourney Weaver and studio executives during their first meeting, she immediately thought it was a great and bold idea. When Fincher asked how she felt about shaving her head for the role, she jokingly replied "It's fine with me only as long as I get more money!" Although many of the other actors were a bit reluctant to go bald, they unanimously agreed after hearing that Weaver would do the same. They later enjoyed intimidating people off-set with their shaven look, and would nickname the film "Skinheads in Space".

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Lance Henriksen only agreed to reprise his role as Bishop as a personal favor to Walter Hill. To this day, Henriksen has said that he dislikes the film for its nihilistic themes, although he had "a lot of fun" making it.

                >One draft of the shooting script included a scene where a chestburster comes out of Michael Biehn's character, Hicks, during hypersleep, which starts the electrical fire and initiates the ejection procedure. This was later abandoned in favor of having the EEV crash and sink; the water pressure eventually crushes the EEV, floods it and breaks a metal support beam that impales the sleeping Hicks, after which air bags deploy that bring the EEV back to the surface. In the final version, the beam breaks and impales Hicks upon impacting the ocean, so a replica of the actor with his chest torn open (due to the impalement) was created for this purpose. Biehn found out about this by accident when Raffaella De Laurentiis, one of the producers of his movie Timebomb (1991), told him that she had seen this replica when visiting Pinewood Studios. Erroneously thinking the wound was from a chestburster, he threatened to sue the producers for using his likeness without his consent. Even when director David Fincher contacted him for permission, Biehn (still unaware of the misunderstanding) angrily refused to have his character go out like that, so a non-identifiable replica was used. Later, the producers contacted him to use his picture at the beginning of the film for the computer sequence. Apparently, Biehn received more money for use of this one image than for his entire role in Aliens (1986). Biehn later stated that, had he any idea of the kind of career Fincher would have, he might have been more accommodating, in the hopes of getting a chance to work with him on a subsequent project.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >At one point, David Fincher was denied permission by the film's producers to shoot a crucial scene in the infirmary between Ripley and the Alien, where the latter menacingly closes in on Ripley. Against orders, Fincher grabbed Sigourney Weaver, a camera and shot the scene anyway. This scene not only appears in the final cut, but also featured prominently in trailers, and many regard it as the movie's most iconic shot.
                The ironing.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Why was Walter Hill such a dick? Didn't he come from a background of trying to make independent films? You would think ge would be more sympathetic to somebody trying to get his start.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This, seems like a different guy. What a waste.
                The guy who made The Warriors taking an Alien movie seriously would have been excellent. But it's like he was deliberately trolling and running up the development budgets.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Sounds like he wanted both producers credit and writers credit, and the wages for both, so he shilled his own shitty script hard even though it was shit.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >(featuring Alien versions of dogs, cats, pigs, chickens, and even a mosquito), copious amounts of gore (including explicit mauling, explosive decompression and an Alien death by chainsaw) and even a graphic, gratuitous zero-gravity sex scene.
                We missed out on pure kino, boys.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Honestly this probably wouldnt have been as bad as they are making it out to be.
                Ok, maybe the mosquito is a bit much.
                PTSD Ripley wouldve really been interesting over gurl power one.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >While unused Alien 3 screenplays by William Gibson, Vincent Ward and David Twohy have gained significant cult following over the years, Red's version has been widely ridiculed for its poor writing, B-horror movie tone (featuring Alien versions of dogs, cats, pigs, chickens, and even a mosquito), copious amounts of gore (including explicit mauling, explosive decompression and an Alien death by chainsaw) and even a graphic, gratuitous zero-gravity sex scene. Harlin reportedly quit after he read it; Sigourney Weaver called it "a real disaster, absolutely dreadful", and Red himself disowned it as a "piece of junk" that he wrote after "five weeks of intense, hysterical story conferences with the studio" who just wanted to rush a sequel into production. He also blamed producers Walter Hill and David Giler for giving him "no story or treatment or any real plan for the picture", and hampering his efforts by not wanting Weaver to return.

                >The original screenplay by Vincent Ward and John Fasano contained a scene in a latrine where the Alien was lurking in the space beneath the toilet seats, and would pull unsuspecting victims through the hole. Ward felt it would be both gruesome and funny. There were also scenes where Ripley would start to feel immense survivors' guilt, causing her to hallucinate and see several of her deceased friends and colleagues from the previous movies.

                Kek, Red's script is the clear forerunner of Ridley's Black Goo, possibly the Farmhouse Spacestation in Interstellar, a bunch of stuff in the Ward script for certain, the basic fusing/expansion model for the creature/organism in Virus, and Supernova for the zero G sex scene.

                Really seems like they never let an idea go once it's in the system.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Funny you mention Supernova because that movie also had a cursed production

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    saw this kino when I was like 12 with my best friend and we loved it. we knew nothing about, we were just dropped off at the movies. we probably onions faced at each other when a werewolf showed up bc I remember we had no clue that's what the movie was about

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The movie was a colossal critical and commercial flop
    It's a fun movie, though.

    >wrecked Ricci's career as a leading woman
    From what I recall she said even after a lot of movies she still had to do the casting process for movies and a lot of times wasn't hired by virtue of being such a womanlet
    Kinda sad since she's definitely way better than the current roasties in horror

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Much more of the autopsy scene was filmed than ended up in the final film. A rough cut of the scene originally contained so much gore, that it even made crew members who had worked on it sick to their stomach.

    >Although the Alien that hatched from the dog was a rod puppet, early filmed tests used an actual dog in an alien costume. The dog was a whippet owned by one of the special effects people, which was used to be dressed up in a suit and muzzle. However, the special effects team thought the dog's movements made the Alien look rather comical, so the idea was scrapped in favor of the puppet.

    >For the creation of the definitive Alien Quadrilogy (released on DVD in 2004), 20th Century Fox asked producer Charles de Lauzirika to supervise special editions of all the movies, and thereby proffered David Fincher the proverbial olive branch, giving him free reign him to assemble and comment on his own Director's Cut of Alien3. Fincher declined the offer, being the only one of the four Alien directors not to get involved with the project, stating that all the anguish he had to endure from creative differences and studio interference during production made him unwilling to revisit the film, and even with additional material, there could never be a version he could call a "Director's Cut". Due to this, the extended Special Edition of Alien3 was made without his involvement, but since it was based on an earlier workprint ('assembly cut' in industry terms) which he had supervised, it was unofficially dubbed the "Assembly Cut".

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Cinematographer Alex Thomson replaced Jordan Cronenweth after only 4 shooting days, because his Parkinson's Disease started to affect the work pace (it would claim his life five years later). Though Cronenweth insisted that he was well enough to make it until the end of production, and David Fincher supported him, line producer Ezra Swerdlow forced Cronenweth off the film, largely because he had lost his own father to the same illness several years previously, and knew that if anything, the demanding schedule would likely take a fatal toll on Cronenweth's health. Cronenweth received a special "Thank you" in the end credits. Fincher would later work extensively with his son Jeff Cronenweth.

      >The creature that the Alien impregnates was originally an ox. A birthing scene had already been shot with one, but the host was eventually changed to a Rottweiler dog during a studio-mandated re-shoot, on director David Fincher's own initiative because of several issues: additional shots of the ox with a facehugger had reportedly failed because the cumbersome animal didn't cooperate, and an ox was seen as somewhat incongruous in the film's environment; a dog was felt more likely to produce such a fast and agile Alien. The original ox sequence was later restored for the extended 'Assembly Cut/Special Edition', where all the scenes featuring the dog were removed. However, in the BluRay edition of this version, prisoner Murphy (Christopher Fairbank) can still be heard calling for his dog in one scene.

      >When the powers-that-be decided on a new ending to be shot, Elliot Goldenthal had one night to come up with a new score. He did an all-nighter in the recording studio, composing new music in between short bouts of sleep.

      >The Rottweiler (from which the alien emerges) had to have part of his face shaved to indicate where the facehugger had gripped onto him.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The creature that the Alien impregnates was originally an ox. A birthing scene had already been shot with one, but the host was eventually changed to a Rottweiler dog during a studio-mandated re-shoot, on director David Fincher's own initiative because of several issues: additional shots of the ox with a facehugger had reportedly failed because the cumbersome animal didn't cooperate, and an ox was seen as somewhat incongruous in the film's environment; a dog was felt more likely to produce such a fast and agile Alien. The original ox sequence was later restored for the extended 'Assembly Cut/Special Edition', where all the scenes featuring the dog were removed. However, in the BluRay edition of this version, prisoner Murphy (Christopher Fairbank) can still be heard calling for his dog in one scene.

        >Because of continuous troubles with the film (including producers leaving and executive producer Jon Landau claiming that the film was running behind schedule due to director David Fincher's perfectionism), Fox halted production in England's Pinewood Studios in May/June 1991. The crew returned to LA to hastily assemble a rough version for an initial screening, to identify what was still missing from the film. Fincher spent a year editing the film while also overseeing a new round of filming in LA, which included shooting the finale. However, the studio rejected his intended version and wanted a shorter movie, which required an extensive re-shoot. This was reportedly the last straw for Fincher, who walked away for good after this. The re-shoots reportedly pushed the budget to $65 million, and were done with an almost entirely new crew.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Sigourney Weaver states that she has nothing but respect for director David Fincher's creative vision and style, and acknowledged the extreme studio interference that he was under worked against the film. Her first day of shooting involved her lying naked on a bed, covered by a sheet, half-blind from a contact lens to simulate a bloodshot eye, while Fincher sprinkled lice over her face that crawled into her eyes and ear. She later stated that though she endured harsh conditions and working with gorillas during the filming of Gorillas in the Mist (1988), this was the first time that she nearly freaked out with a director. Fincher made up later with the autopsy scene, where he gained her trust by guiding her through an emotional performance.

          >David Fincher wanted the alien to be "more of a puma, or a beast" as opposed to the upright, humanoid posture of the previous films, so H.R. Giger was contacted to generate new sketch ideas for the chestburster and adult Alien. His revisions included longer and thinner legs, fuller lips, the removal of "pipes" around the spine (which he had only added to make the creature appear less human), and an idea for a sharp alien "tongue" in place of the secondary jaws. Giger also designed an 'aquatic facehugger'. Working from his studio in Zurich, he produced these new sketches which he faxed to Cornelius Defries who then created their model counterparts out of plasticine. However, Tom Woodruff Jr. and Alec Gillis of Amalgamated Dynamics had already been appointed as the lead special effect designers (much to Giger's chagrin, who was told that they would only create suits and models based on his designs). Although they were open to his input, the only one of Giger's designs that wound up in the final project was the "Bambi Burster" Alien that had long legs and walked on all fours.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Some of H.R. Giger's design for the film involved a puma-like alien with claws. The producers also instructed him to do more sexy designs, so he created a drawing of an alien, which, in close view, had the lips of a woman. One of his ideas involved the alien kissing the victims and killing them that way (an idea that was later used in the movie Species (1995) for another Giger creation).

            >Costume Designer Bob Ringwood walked off the film early in production once his work was submitted: he is on record saying he found Director David Fincher difficult and unpleasant to work with.

            >The score was recorded during the Los Angeles riots of 1992, which Elliot Goldenthal later claimed contributed to the score's disturbing nature.

            >The so-called "On Earth" promotional teaser trailer for the movie was released before the final script was approved and the original idea that the movie should be set on Earth was still on the table.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The best thread on TV now

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Vincent Ward's version of Alien 3 should have been made. He was the only person who had an artistic vision for the project.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah. The wooden monastery and the monks would have been very Kino. It's a shame Fox didn't want to support it.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There were probably too many proto-soi scientists b***hing up a storm in letters about the idea of a wood satellite

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Days of Heaven, the director went blind

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ITS EVEN FRICKING WORSE.
    THE WEIN FIRED ROB BOTTIN (HOWLING, AAWIL) IN FAVOR OF CGI.

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Peckinpah was plagued by alcoholism, with which he would struggle for the remainder of his life. This, combined with his clashes with Aubrey and the studio, led to his growing reputation as a difficult, unreliable filmmaker. Reportedly, when Dylan first arrived on the set, he and Kristofferson sat to watch dailies with Peckinpah. The director was so unhappy with the footage that he angrily stood on a folding chair and urinated on the screen.[6] Similar stories began to reach Hollywood, prompting Peckinpah to purchase a full-page ad in The Hollywood Reporter mocking the rumors and the brass at MGM.[6] The Hollywood producers were not amused. The film finished 21 days behind schedule and $1.6 million over budget

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's still crazy to me that Young Guns I&II are the only kino about Billy The Kid.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not the only kino.

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This fricking wienersucker ordered pick related Alice Eve nude scene to be censored. She had a god tier ass up in the air shot in the original cut.

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Location shooting, scheduled for six weeks, stretched to almost six months. The atmosphere on the set became a mirror of the movie plot, with the long-suffering cast and crew becoming more and more alienated by and hostile toward the megalomaniacal co-stars and their tyrannical director.
    Kino

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Due to the large number of untrained animals on set, there were a reported 48 injuries within two years of the start of filming.
    >It has been estimated that, of Roar's 140-person crew, at least 70 were injured during production.
    >Noel Marshall was bitten through the hand when he interacted with male lions during a fight scene; doctors initially feared that he might lose his arm.
    > During a promo shoot in 1973, Hedren was bitten in the head by a lion, Cherries, whose teeth scraped against her skull.
    >She was admitted to Antelope Valley Hospital after Tembo, the five-ton elephant, picked her up with his trunk by the ankle, fracturing it before bucking her off his back
    >Several days earlier Tembo had bucked his trainer into a tree and broken her shoulder.
    >Griffith received 50 sutures after being attacked by a lioness. It was feared that she would lose an eye, but she eventually recovered without being disfigured, although she did require some facial reconstruction
    >Jerry Marshall was bitten in the thigh by a lion while he was in a cage on set, and he was in hospital alongside Hedren for a month.
    > Togar, one of the lead lions, bit assistant director Doron Kauper in the throat and jaw and tried to pull off one of his ears after Kauper unintentionally cued an attack; Kauper also received injuries to his scalp, chest and thigh, and he was admitted to Palmdale General Hospital where he had to undergo four and a half hours of surgery
    > After witnessing the attacks, twenty crew members left the set en masse; turnover was high, and many did not want to return.
    >Because of Marshall's financial proceeds from his producer credit on The Exorcist, rumors spread that the set of Roar was plagued by the "curse of The Exorcist

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      great theme song though

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Surprised this was not shut down for safety reasons

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It was an independent movie shot on the producer's own property, so I don't think no anybody could do anything about it

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How many people would have to be mauled by animals before you would quit a production?

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    'The feeling was we're really auteur filmmakers, we can do anything we want, we can go anywhere we want.' Screenwriter Walon Green (quoted in 'Easy Riders, Raging Bulls' by Peter Biskind, 1998.)

    After the huge success of THE FRENCH CONNECTION (1971) and THE EXORCIST (1973), the former winning him a Best Director Academy Award, William Friedkin was at the height of his career. When he decided his follow-up would be a remake of Henri-Georges Clouzot's 1953 classic THE WAGES OF FEAR (aka LE SALAIRE DE LA PEUR), many in Hollywood thought it was sheer hubris and that his run of success would end. (Friedkin only managed to get Clouzot to cough up the remake rights by convincing him that he wasn't likely to make a better film, and only managed to get the film financed by claiming to MCA head Lew Wasserman that he would even be willing to make the film for free. Luckily for Friedkin he didn't have to make it for free, but he did get a reduced fee.) Well, his detractors (Friedkin's 'confidence' had won him some enemies in Hollywood, and the production of SORCERER would win him more) were right about the latter. The film was a critical and commercial failure, and when people talk about Friedkin, it's always THE FRENCH CONNECTION and THE EXORCIST, and maybe TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A. (1985). Rarely do they talk about SORCERER, unless it's as one of the most misguided moves by a filmmaker at his peak. But the cult of SORCERER seems to be growing, and desevedly so. It's a brilliant film in it's own right, a superb remake, and although it ended Friedkin's glory days in Hollywood, it's as great if not better than CONNECTION and EXORCIST.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      After the failure of Dennis Hopper's THE LAST MOVIE (1971) and other movies made studios unlikely to ever fund counterculture filmmakers' personal visions again, the blockbuster success of Francis Ford Coppola's THE GODFATHER (1972), followed by THE EXORCIST (1973), Spielberg's JAWS and Lucas's STAR WARS (1977) saw the arrival of a new breed of filmmakers, dubbed the 'Movie Brats' by the press. Most of these filmmakers were young, obsessed with film, and educated at film schools. They wanted to make hugely successful movies in order to fund their more personal projects, and weren't always averse to compromise. By the end of the decade and first few years of the next, these filmmakers had either failed to fulfil their promise (Paul Schrader, John Milius), bankrupted themselves (Coppola) or helped bankrupt a studio (Michael Cimino), become moguls themselves (Lucas), learned to play ball (Spielberg, after 1979's war comedy 1941, had to prove he could make films on budget), found critical success but not commercial success (Scorsese after RAGING BULL, 1980) or alienated themselves in Hollywood (Friedkin after SORCERER). Like Scorsese's NEW YORK, NEW YORK (1977), Spielberg's 1941, Coppola's APOCALYPSE NOW (1979) and ONE FROM THE HEART (1982) and Cimino's HEAVEN'S GATE (1980), SORCERER was a movie whose budget ran amok, and had studio investors biting their nails down to the quick. It began with a budget of $2.5m, and was intended as a small project he could make before embarking on the ambitious 'The Devil's Triangle', about ships and planes disappearing into space in the Bermuda Triangle. It ballooned into a $22m project, requiring Universal and Paramount to co-produce the picture. (It only recouped $9m.) Friedkin got it into his head that they would film on location in South America, an exorbitant idea that would lose the film an interested and bankable lead in Steve McQueen, who refused to leave wife Ali McGraw's side.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        McQueen loved the script and even asked if McGraw could be made a producer so that she could accompany him on location, but the request was denied. Friedkin later regretted the decision, believing that with McQueen as the lead the film could have been a hit.
        > SORCERER was eventually mainly filmed on location in the Dominican Republic and Central Mexico (for the trucks' journey to the oil refinery). Lew Wasserman had wanted to film in Ecuador, but a civil war had broken out. Peter Bart in his memoir 'Infamous Players: A Tale of Movies, the Mob (And Sex)' (2011) claims that Gulf & Western owner Charlie Bluhdorn was effectively keeping the Dominican Republic afloat with cash injections, and wanted to create a filmmaking mecca in the country. (Gulf & Western was the conglomerate that owned Paramount.) He had his own lavish mansion in the unstable country, complete with armed guards at it's perimeters. So it's likely the decision to film in the Dominican Republic was one favoured by Bluhdorn. One of the most extraordinary qualities of SORCERER is how Friedkin (and cinematographers John M. Stephens and Dick Bush) manage to vividly portray such a dark, dank, rainy hellhole of squalor, deprivation and death. One can almost feel the grime and smell the sweat and the stench (it's made all the more striking by following a scene set in an opulent Paris restaurant). And yet it was a location loved for it's beauty by the man who helped to bankroll the film (Bluhdorn owned the conglomerate Gulf & Western, which owned Paramount)! It's not clear if this upset Bluhdorn, but certainly using a photo of the board members to represent the film's evil conglomerate did. Peter Biskind's 'Easy Riders, Raging Bulls' (1998) details Friedkin's alleged behaviour towards the studio, and characterises him as a man unwilling to compromise with anybody.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The film was a risky commercial proposition, and all eyes were on the budget as it started to escalate during the ten month shoot. Friedkin had made money for studios with his two big hits, so his instincts as a filmmaker were trusted, if reluctantly. The director insisted on filming in Jerusalem (blowing up a huge building) and Paris for two of the backstories, which the studios weren't happy about. (Friedkin apparently had a terrible time filming in the former location.) SORCERER was a remake of a French classic, but to mass audiences, this didn't matter one jot. Apart from Roy Scheider, the film has no Western leads. Much of the film is subtitled (mostly the 20 minute plus opening), an anaethma to big audiences. The film's lead characters are unsympathetic people whom we never really learn much about. It's only clear after the story shifts to Nicaragua how the characters connect. (The opening section of the movie, and the final scene, were cut out in Europe and Australia, the footage amounting to some 28 minutes. It was also retitled WAGES OF FEAR, and the characters' backstories were relayed through flashbacks. Friedkin successfully sued in Europe using moral legislation grounds.) The location is completely unappealing and distancing, and the ending is a complete and utter downer. Even the title promised to hurt it's commercial chances. There was nothing supernatural about the film's story at all. This film was going to have to be a particularly brilliant and exciting film to recoup it's budget.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Friedkin lost 50lbs during the shoot and contacted malaria (as did many). Half of his crew left the production because of the difficulties. He also had to contend with local Federales going undercover and joining the crew as extras to root out drug users. One actor had to perform his scene with two police officers pointing a gun at him out of shot. Friedkin only managed to get the scene done because he had befriended the Federales' superior. After the scene was shot, the actor was taken away in handcuffs.
            > Friedkin filmed Sorcerer on location. Each of the four prologues was filmed in their respective cities, but the director loved Ecuador to double for Columbia. Pushback from Universal led the filming to move to the Dominican Republic.
            > Approximately fifty people had to leave the film for either injury or gangrene as well as food poisoning and malaria. Friedkin admitted almost half the crew went into the hospital or had to be sent home.
            > Outside of the health issues, Friedkin ran afoul of almost everyone else involved in production. He fired five production managers, went through a number of explosives experts, replaced the original director of photography Dick Bush with John M. Stephens, and dismissed the chief Teamsters representative in charge of the trucks.
            >Despite the employment of stuntmen, the main actors performed a number of their own stunts at Friedkin’s insistence. Scheider said that shooting the film made Jaws look like a picnic. Amidou stated to the Morocco Times in 2005 that this film made the most lasting impression since he refused to have a substitute and paid for it physically

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              > The two most harrowing sequences in the film are the attempts of each truck to cross a rotten bridge during a violent thunderstorm. John Box designed the bridge using carefully hidden hydraulics allowing control of the movement of the bridge and the trucks. The first iteration cost $1 million to complete, but mother nature got in the way.
              > Upon completion, the river underneath was nearly empty due to abnormally low rainfall. Box scouted different locations and settled on the Papaloapan River in Mexico. The entire bridge was disassembled and re-anchored. Drought also struck the new location. The filmmakers utilized practical effects to complete the scene. A set of sewage pumps drained water from the river and diverted it to a sprinkler system.
              > While filming in Mexico, an undercover federal agent informed Friedkin that several of his crew members were in possession of drugs and were forced to leave the country or face prison sentences. It took two weeks to replace them. The two scenes, totaling 12 minutes, took several months to film and cost approximately $3 million.
              > Following the fraught production, Paramount, and Universal Pictures agreed to a distribution deal to open the film on June 24, 1977. While Universal would handle the western United States, Paramount would handle the eastern US. The push-pull between both studios would be a problem for the film and for Friedkin.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The shaking and swaying of the bridge was achieved by placing hydraulic mechanisms underneath to simulate its flimsy nature, and oftentimes the trucks themselves were attached to the bridge in order to keep them from slipping off. Even so, they did fall into the river, many times, once while Friedkin was inside the cab. The actors were often actually driving the trucks, or at least steering them, and somehow none of them were ever seriously hurt. The two bridge sequences together, lasting about 12 minutes in the film, took several months to complete and chewed up around $3 million of the movie’s growing cost.
                > Another of the movie’s key moments is when the trucks arrive at a gigantic fallen tree that’s blocking their route; the only solution to use some of the nitro and blast the thing to smithereens. The production hit a snag when it turned out they didn’t have nearly enough explosives on hand to actually put a sizable dent in the tree, so Friedkin called a disreputable associate of his from New York to help. “Marvin the Torch” was an arsonist who blew up buildings for people looking to collect the insurance money, and although he was supposedly retired from this questionable line of work, he still flew to the Dominican Republic armed with a couple of suitcases filled with quote-unquote “beauty supplies.” At the end of the day, Marvin detonated the tree, the explosion was spectacular, and “the Torch” was back on a plane a day or so later.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                After filming on the movie was complete – a shoot that lasted somewhere in the crazy neighborhood of ten months – editing began, which at least according to Friedkin went fairly smoothly. But the studios were nervous, unsure if they had just tossed over $20 million into a flaming oil well. After some execs from Universal saw an early cut, they summoned Friedkin to a meeting to discuss. Friedkin brought writer Walon Green and his editor Bud Smith to the meeting, instructing them to just stare blankly at the suits as they read over their notes, but not to nod or agree with anything they said. Friedkin himself ordered a bottle of vodka and began drinking straight from the bottle during the meeting, eventually falling on the floor. The aim was to disorient the executives so much that they would just leave them alone, which is pretty much exactly what happened. Friedkin had final cut on Sorcerer, and was intent on crafting the masterpiece he had pictured from the start.
                > To score the film, Friedkin hired German electronic group Tangerine Dream, who he’d seen play a concert in Germany years earlier. Friedkin was mesmerized by their music and asked if they’d be interested in scoring his next movie. He eventually sent them the script for Sorcerer and wanted them to write the score based only on the pages; in fact, they finished the score and sent him the tapes while he was still shooting the film. In an unusual creative decision, Friedkin and his editor eventually cut the movie to match the eerie and surreal score.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >hire an arsonist from NY to fly to Dominican Republic with 2 suitcases full of high explosives to blow up a tree
                It was truly a different time

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Friedkin called a disreputable associate of his from New York to help. “Marvin the Torch” was an arsonist who blew up buildings for people looking to collect the insurance money, and although he was supposedly retired from this questionable line of work, he still flew to the Dominican Republic armed with a couple of suitcases filled with quote-unquote “beauty supplies.” At the end of the day, Marvin detonated the tree, the explosion was spectacular, and “the Torch” was back on a plane a day or so later.
                The ultimate "I know a guy" story.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >(Friedkin apparently had a terrible time filming in the former location.)
            The ironing.

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is the Assembly Cut better than the theatrical version?

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Obligatory Blade: Trinity post.

    >The story first came to light courtesy of A.V. Club writer Zack Handlen’s review of the “Blade: Trinity” DVD commentary, in which Goyer says: “The other thing that happened in this scene is that Blade opened his eyes, and on the day, Wesley did not open his eyes.”

    >Allegedly upset with the production over its lackluster Black representation, Snipes would only communicate with Goyer via Post-it notes, signing them in character as Blade.

    >"I remember one day on the set — they let everyone pick their own clothes — there was one Black actor who was also kind of a club kid. And he wore this shirt with the word "Garbage" on it in big stylish letters. It was his shirt. And Wesley came down to the set, which he only did for close-ups. Everything else was done by his stand-in. I only did one scene with him. But he comes on and goes, "There's only one other Black guy in the movie, and you make him wear a shirt that says 'Garbage?' You racist motherf***er! And he tried to strangle the director, David Goyer."

    >In his interview, Oswalt also said that Snipes stayed in character at all times, and that he only interacted with "Blade," never with Snipes. Oswalt explains: "When I met him I was like, "Hi!" And he was like, 'I'm Blade.'"(In his Vice interview, Snipes denied that he stayed in character for the entire shoot, and questioned Oswalt's knowledge of method acting.) According to Oswalt, Snipes stayed in his trailer smoking weed for most of the shoot, leaving the rest of the cast to their own devices. Goyer encouraged the cast to ad-lib their lines, and much of Reynold's sass is a result of performing with either Snipes' stand-in or with Snipes himself not reacting at all. While it served as a good test run for Reynolds to figure out his Deadpool-style humor, the final result is a total mess of a movie.

  30. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >WE MUST REMAKE SCREAM BUT WITH WEREWOLVES.

    Bob Weinstein is such a fricking hack. Without his brother he would have been a nobody.

  31. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0921459/bio/
    >...Oskar Werner became an international sensation alongside French star Jeanne Moreau, in François Truffaut's 'New Wave' cinematic masterpiece Jules and Jim (1962)
    >Truffaut blessed him as well with another sterling role, in the futuristic classic Fahrenheit 451 (1966), but the relationship between both of the men was irreparably damaged over artistic differences during filming.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060390/trivia/
    >According to Fahrenheit 451 producer Lewis M. Allen, François Truffaut and Oskar Werner hated each other by the end of filming. For the last two weeks, they didn't speak to one another.
    >Oskar Werner cut his hair for the final scene to purposely create a continuity error. This was due to his hatred for the director.

    >...Oskar Werner was found dead by heart attack on 23 October, 1984, at the age of 61. He passed away only two days after Truffaut.

  32. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What a fricking shitshow.
    The wrong Weinstein got gangrene

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