Okay, but who really had the best business card?

Okay, but who really had the best business card?

Unattended Children Pitbull Club Shirt $21.68

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

Unattended Children Pitbull Club Shirt $21.68

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why do they all have the same phone number

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Timothy Bryce or the irish dude they show later

      its the number you get redirected from

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They all have bullshit jobs at the same company doing nothing

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They have a secretary that screens their calls and forwards them to an extension.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        jealous

        They have a secretary that screens their calls and forwards them to an extension.

        this. most people ITT have never held a job let alone worked somewhere that values them.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          not true. I used to be the lead sandwich artist at the deli, until I had to quit from mental breakdowns.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Thank you for your service

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          i've worked at mcdonalds, burger king, KFC, dennys, taco bell
          you don't know SHIT about me

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      People of their status never have a direct line on their business car. It goes to a receptionist.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's the number they'd get if they become Vice Presidents.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The gay had the best card.
    That was the point.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Whoever designed these should have got an Oscar for it. The contrast between Bateman's card which screams, "Trying to hard while consciously not wanting it to look like I'm trying to hard" vs. how Paul Allen's is objectively the best with an air of effortlessness is perfect. Plus you have Bryce and Van Pattens cards being basically the same with inconsequential differences. Then later the gay guy comes in with the flashy over designed cars. Just a masterclass of prop design

      I'd say that while Paul Allen's card is the objectively superior card, the gay's card as garish as it was, still managed to separate himself from the pack, outdoing Bateman.
      Dubs guy has a competent but ultimately foregettable card.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why are their last names all capitilized
    its so garish

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Paul Allen
    2. Patrick Bateman
    3. David Van Patten
    4. SHIT
    5. Timothy Bryce

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      High quality taste

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen unironically. Extremely tasteful but also modern serif font, pleasing margins, and he put his fax and telephone on a second line instead of shoving it all into one line.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Paul Allen also has a pleasing name to say. He won.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    lol they're all vice president, never noticed that before

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a legal thing. There are contracts that you have to be VP or above to sign. Mostly to do with purchasing.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's a banking thing, everyone at a large investment bank is a Vice President, it's a title they give out like candy, your actual job might be something like "Investment Advisor" or something and your title can be Officer, Assistant Vice President, Vice President, Director, Senior Vice President.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's a sales thing too. Makes customers feel important.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's a legal thing. There are contracts that you have to be VP or above to sign. Mostly to do with purchasing.

      And they all work in the Mergers and "Aquisitions" branch

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This scene was to show how effeminate Bateman is. This is stuff girls and gays care about, like arguing over a specific shade of purple.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's not "purple" it's LILAC, stupid chud

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't say "effeminate", more superficial. Women often care about superficial shit, but so do powerful elite men.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thirdie poorgay hands wrote this.
      Of course someone from the lowest stratum of society like you wouldn't care about looking fresh in all aspects of his life.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        gay

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Concession accepted, thirdie.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    paul allen's is the most readable

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    patrick's is the worst

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen's card is definitely the best. Second best is Bryce's, worst is unironically Bateman's. Frick ever font that has inconsistently-sized numbers.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Frick ever font that has inconsistently-sized numbers.
      That's an old style typist way of centering numbers. It makes Bateman's card look more "European".

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        American businessmen in NY absolutely would have thought 'European' was for gays at that point in time.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen, unironically. It prioritizes the person who it's given to, while maintaining style:

    1. Clear, legible, readable font.
    2. No unnecessary, tacky business card texture
    3. Contact info separated onto its own line

    The only thing wrong with it is Paul's name is slightly larger than the companies, which can be seen as a faux pas in some circles (it can also be a testament to the person's confidence though. Depends on who you ask.)

    Bryce comes in second.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if Bryce is second then you must not mind the tacky business card texture that much

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Whoever designed these should have got an Oscar for it. The contrast between Bateman's card which screams, "Trying to hard while consciously not wanting it to look like I'm trying to hard" vs. how Paul Allen's is objectively the best with an air of effortlessness is perfect. Plus you have Bryce and Van Pattens cards being basically the same with inconsequential differences. Then later the gay guy comes in with the flashy over designed cars. Just a masterclass of prop design

      Allen’s card is the worst you stupid pieces of rotten shit, batemans is the best. You have no taste, have a nice day

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Where's the "watermark" that Bateman mentions?

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Patten > Bryce > Bateman = Paul Allen

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Whoever designed these should have got an Oscar for it. The contrast between Bateman's card which screams, "Trying to hard while consciously not wanting it to look like I'm trying to hard" vs. how Paul Allen's is objectively the best with an air of effortlessness is perfect. Plus you have Bryce and Van Pattens cards being basically the same with inconsequential differences. Then later the gay guy comes in with the flashy over designed cars. Just a masterclass of prop design

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Then later the gay guy comes in with the flashy over designed cars.
      Really? I thought the whole point of bateman seething was that Luis had basically copied his card, except with extra color and gold lettering. Certainly the other guys find it tacky, but bateman feels like he's being overshadowed by a card so similar to his.

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Patten>Paul Allen>Bateman>Bryce

    I like that rough texture on the card, makes it seem luxurious compared to standard smooth white that you can get from any schmuck's business. The second factor was how the font looks for their names.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Allen's is too formulaic, it is like a memo for the accounting department not a business card for a client. It has to be Bryce.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bryce's cardstock with Allen's everything else would be kino. The margin at the top of Bryce's is way too thick and that font looks shit on that stock.

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Timothy Bryce and it's not even close

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Okay, but who really had the best business card?
    The point isn't who has the best business card. It's that they all have the same fricking business card and they have the same fricking job.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      shut up redditor

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you're just pissed because you don't really get the movie.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This isn't the point. Each card is an extension of the individual. Yes, they're all black font on white cardstock, and they're all corpo-vp buttholes, but both the individuals and their cards are individually unique enough to differentiate.

      That's why it's important to the scene that Batemen's delivery of "New card. What do ya think?" is dry and dead. The fact that it's "bone.". Also, it's probably just a coincedence, but "silian rail" anagrams to "all liars in".

      The others, meanwhile are less threatening, and even kind of goofy: "Eggshell" "Nimbus".

      And it's why Paul Allen's card feels so threatening to Batemen; Allen's the only one who really exerted any kind of actual threatening energy on Patrick, and his response to Allen's card is largely a reflection of that.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        100%. Even though we meme about it you could write a whole paper on how the differences in the cards mirror the characters and their dynamics with each other. Saying, "The whole point is they look the same at a quick glance" is a surface level, midwit, take

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the joke is the cards are nearly identical, the point of the movie is they're all the same but they compete for superior levels of conformity

      Is this a media literacy thing?

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen's is the one I'd remember the most.

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen has the best one.

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What was the point in spelling acquisitions wrong? To suggest they're all kind of sloppy, or don't take their jobs that seriously?

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It was obviously Paul.

  25. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You are now older than Christian Bale was filming American Psycho. How does that make you feel?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      makes me wish i was born into old money like his character

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hah, he is also older now.

  26. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  27. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paul Allen

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous
      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >four

  28. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    None of them, they're all illiterate and can't spell "Acquisitions" correctly

  29. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone have the webm where the cards are forum signatures?

  30. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Font alone (readability and character):
    >Copperplate Gothic (Allen)
    >Bodoni (VanPatten)
    >Garamond Classico (Bateman)
    >Helvetica (Bryce)
    >Edwardian Standard Medium (Carruthers)

  31. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Van Patten>Bryce>Allen>Bateman

  32. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Carruthers is the only one I could pick out of the lineup, so that’s clearly the most effective.

  33. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the book is the funniest thing you will ever read

  34. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tobias

  35. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  36. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I personally would go with a style like Bryce's, but maybe that's just because having seen the film I know what an outright chad Bryce happens to be.
    I've chosen Van Patten in the past - - that fricking Home Depot font for his name is a very bold move. I really think it's the nicest looking of all of them. Paul Allen's is by far the most legible and it's objectively the best for that moment, that scene, but it's a bit too plain for me to really get excited about.

    Bateman's.. hoo boy, where to begin. The aforementioned "european style" numbering, very gay. The lettering too is just.. that font is painful to look at. It's a card that makes you squint. I don't know what the frick he was thinking.

    >carruthers
    I'll say that it's definitely fitting for him. That's fine, nothing wrong with that.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I forgot to mention the engraved look to the print on bateman's card, yuck. It makes the cardstock stand out and not in a good way. It just looks like it'll suck the grease right off your fingers. Yep, handle that bad boy just once or twice and I bet it looks disgusting. Bateman is a disgusting man with a disgusting card

  37. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    paul but it has better lighting than Bateman's. Batemans imprint is too deep however

  38. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bateman and allen's are the same

  39. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Marcus Halbertstram

  40. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Caruthers' is king and kino

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >surname first
      Seriously, what was his fricking problem?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        he was not just secretly gay but secretly chinese

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gold lettering
      flagrantly homosexual

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        he themed his entire business personality off being a homosexual irishman, in a sense its perfect

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's the worse but the most distinct

  41. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Van Patten's eggshell texture is disgusting. It looks like a piece of cardboard you'd find soiled on a park bench, even though the lettering is clear and striking. Composition-wise, the spacing is good too: the borders are neither too thin nor thick, the edges and corners of the card look like they're being put to use. However, there's a lot of space between the name in the centre and the relatively finely printed telephone number in the top left: it draws attention to the horrible eggshell texture. The company name is printed in small font too, but he did a good job of writing "mergers and aquisitions [sic]" in lower-case (with the first letters capitalised), since that makes it more legible.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bateman's card has nice lettering - I love the font - and the embossing is a nice touch. However, the top border looks too thick to me: there's a lot of waste space above the number and company name, and it gives an impression like it was cut out by hand with a pair of scissors not 5 minutes ago. Contrast this with his bottom border which is too thin, an impression compounded by the small font of the address. I agree with the criticisms of another youtuber in the comments to a video of this scene who noticed that Bateman's numbers are uneven, for example with the 5's drooping down below the line and giving the card an untidy appearance. Bateman's font is even smaller than Van Patten's so the large uneven numbers in the top left stand out especially. Also I've heard it mentioned that the ampersand between the 2 "pierces" in the company name is closer to the right "pierce", also giving the card a mediocre presentation. Bateman has "Vice president' written in all caps, which gives off a more solid impression. Van Patten's lower-case "Vice President" makes it look like he's Vice President of Ubisoft, maybe, but not a respectable trading firm. However, Bateman's preference for capitalisation produces an undesirable effect with "mergers and aquisitions [sic]", because his small font squeezes the space-hungry capitals together, which sacrifices legibility. Van Patten's card also has the bonus of his name written in bold and tying the card into a coherent ensemble with a central visual point of reference, but perhaps a little too bold: makes it look like it's printed on a Wild West saloon and ruins the air of refinement and sophistication the card was supposed to convey.
      Bateman's card, which is already lacking in tidiness, suffers from Bateman's aversion to bold lettering.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Bryce's card seems to be free from the compositional and lettering-related weaknesses of Bateman's card and doesn't quite match the textural catastrophe of Van Patten's. The "Pale Nimbus" texture or whatever still isn't a choice I would make: it doesn't stand out that much, but it still looks like the shitty wallpaper in my room. You can even see a few crease-like
        imperfections on the top edge of the card, and it's just begging for one dirty finger dragging an unpleasant looking grease mark over it. Can't comment definitively on the numbers in the top left and the general compositional value, since Bryce is covering a key portion with his fingers. Once again, I don't like the Vice President written in lower-case, but in this case, the offence is greater because of the poor choice of lettering. Bryce was obviously going for a "simpler and crisper" look, opting for a sans-serif font, mostly lower-case, but it robs the card of all class: that's a lettering choice you'd see on an immigration checkpoint at Bristol harbour maybe, but not on a wall street business card. I wouldn't hesitate to call it plebeian. The embossing is a minor saving grace here. I feel the card would benefit from having his name printed in bold like Van Patten. Overall the card looks like a practice resume written in Arial in MS Word by a high school graduate.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Now Paul Allen's card is indeed a work of art. My heart jumped a little when I saw it again after all that dross. First of all, no moronic textures: simple, plain, white ( or "subtle off-white"). The size of the letters is perfect: very easily legible and clear. Notice how the address and contact details are written in two separate lines at the bottom. This allows them to be big enough to make out easily, it allows the address to be intuitively separated from the fax/telex numbers, it avoids the situation of having to squeeze that salad of symbols into a thin pathetic ribbon scratched at the bottom, like the others do. it allows the two lines of information to use up the space at the bottom of the card and prevents the information spilling over into the corners and distracting from the rest of the card. Text is embossed, name and position is in bold, of course, with the name written in larger font, tying the card together. At first I was conflicted about the serif-situation: I stated early that serifs are the source of class, but there was something about his lettering that seemed to defy that. Now I take a closer look and see that he actually does use serifs, but they're so discreet that you almost can't make them out. The resulting effect is phenomenal though: it still looks authoritative, even without the established, lofty vibe of fonts with more classical serifs. If there were one criticism I had to offer, I would say the company name could be written in bolder font with larger serifs, but I fear the card is already balancing on a perfect combination of simplicity and compositional density, and this would overcomplicate it.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bateman's card has nice lettering - I love the font - and the embossing is a nice touch. However, the top border looks too thick to me: there's a lot of waste space above the number and company name, and it gives an impression like it was cut out by hand with a pair of scissors not 5 minutes ago. Contrast this with his bottom border which is too thin, an impression compounded by the small font of the address. I agree with the criticisms of another youtuber in the comments to a video of this scene who noticed that Bateman's numbers are uneven, for example with the 5's drooping down below the line and giving the card an untidy appearance. Bateman's font is even smaller than Van Patten's so the large uneven numbers in the top left stand out especially. Also I've heard it mentioned that the ampersand between the 2 "pierces" in the company name is closer to the right "pierce", also giving the card a mediocre presentation. Bateman has "Vice president' written in all caps, which gives off a more solid impression. Van Patten's lower-case "Vice President" makes it look like he's Vice President of Ubisoft, maybe, but not a respectable trading firm. However, Bateman's preference for capitalisation produces an undesirable effect with "mergers and aquisitions [sic]", because his small font squeezes the space-hungry capitals together, which sacrifices legibility. Van Patten's card also has the bonus of his name written in bold and tying the card into a coherent ensemble with a central visual point of reference, but perhaps a little too bold: makes it look like it's printed on a Wild West saloon and ruins the air of refinement and sophistication the card was supposed to convey.
      Bateman's card, which is already lacking in tidiness, suffers from Bateman's aversion to bold lettering.

      Bryce's card seems to be free from the compositional and lettering-related weaknesses of Bateman's card and doesn't quite match the textural catastrophe of Van Patten's. The "Pale Nimbus" texture or whatever still isn't a choice I would make: it doesn't stand out that much, but it still looks like the shitty wallpaper in my room. You can even see a few crease-like
      imperfections on the top edge of the card, and it's just begging for one dirty finger dragging an unpleasant looking grease mark over it. Can't comment definitively on the numbers in the top left and the general compositional value, since Bryce is covering a key portion with his fingers. Once again, I don't like the Vice President written in lower-case, but in this case, the offence is greater because of the poor choice of lettering. Bryce was obviously going for a "simpler and crisper" look, opting for a sans-serif font, mostly lower-case, but it robs the card of all class: that's a lettering choice you'd see on an immigration checkpoint at Bristol harbour maybe, but not on a wall street business card. I wouldn't hesitate to call it plebeian. The embossing is a minor saving grace here. I feel the card would benefit from having his name printed in bold like Van Patten. Overall the card looks like a practice resume written in Arial in MS Word by a high school graduate.

      Now Paul Allen's card is indeed a work of art. My heart jumped a little when I saw it again after all that dross. First of all, no moronic textures: simple, plain, white ( or "subtle off-white"). The size of the letters is perfect: very easily legible and clear. Notice how the address and contact details are written in two separate lines at the bottom. This allows them to be big enough to make out easily, it allows the address to be intuitively separated from the fax/telex numbers, it avoids the situation of having to squeeze that salad of symbols into a thin pathetic ribbon scratched at the bottom, like the others do. it allows the two lines of information to use up the space at the bottom of the card and prevents the information spilling over into the corners and distracting from the rest of the card. Text is embossed, name and position is in bold, of course, with the name written in larger font, tying the card together. At first I was conflicted about the serif-situation: I stated early that serifs are the source of class, but there was something about his lettering that seemed to defy that. Now I take a closer look and see that he actually does use serifs, but they're so discreet that you almost can't make them out. The resulting effect is phenomenal though: it still looks authoritative, even without the established, lofty vibe of fonts with more classical serifs. If there were one criticism I had to offer, I would say the company name could be written in bolder font with larger serifs, but I fear the card is already balancing on a perfect combination of simplicity and compositional density, and this would overcomplicate it.

      Based autism

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        if i could write/think like that id finish my american psycho inspired story about a patrick bateman type college professor that teaches at a prestigious university

  42. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Embossed gold 12 point Courier font on bone white semi-gloss stock
    Its haunting elegance is so restrained

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  43. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    OH N-

  44. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    "Lets see Batman's card."

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  45. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >can't analyse some poem in literature class
    >could write essays about the business card design in a movie
    why is it like that?

  46. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    David>Paul>Patrick/Timothy

  47. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bryce's font is terrible, Bryce and Patten's texture is distracting, Allen's lowercase being smaller uppercase is gay. Bateman's is the best.

  48. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rolling

  49. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > we saw "Africa, o brave Africa" it was a laugh riot

  50. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the joke is the cards are nearly identical, the point of the movie is they're all the same but they compete for superior levels of conformity

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You seriously don't understand graphic design, and have zero taste.

  51. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For me it's Newman

  52. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Every card spells acquisitions wrong.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *