screenwriting

are you working on a screenplay at the moment?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yes it's coming along well

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm always working on a new spec.
    Just finished a sexy crime thriller set in Miami.
    Had a meeting a couple days ago with a manager & producer about my Giallo-style murder mystery script and they both seemed to like me/the script, but did not offer to sign me or do anything further with the project. The manager said her "bandwidth was limited" atm or some bullshit, despite her having a client list of absolute nobodies who barely have any credits. Doesn't seem like anyone is buying specs right now, the entire industry feels like a barren wasteland of shit.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What did your miami crime thriller get on Black List?

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't understand the point. No one buys original movies, and they certainly never get made. Seems like it's a more realistic option to write a book and hope it gets adapted. Is it just because it's the lazy man's way to get into the industry?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Seems like it's a more realistic option to write a book
      Agreed. That's what I'm doing.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I disagree. Unless your book is a bestseller, or has an existing audience, there is very little chance of it being made into a movie.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah at least the market for movies is still reasonably robust. Literally no one physically reads in the internet age unless you're a professional academic or wealthy/retired with loads of free time.
          The established movie industry of the last 10-15 years is absolutely cratering right now and the demand for new screenwriting talent is about to skyrocket.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Literally no one physically reads in the internet age
            In much of the West, kind of true. Guess which market I'm going for...
            >The established movie industry of the last 10-15 years is absolutely cratering right now and the demand for new screenwriting talent is about to skyrocket
            I don't follow you there. If the industry's in decline (and it surely is, if you're talking about Hollywood at least), that means fewer opportunities, not more. And if your point is that modern Hollywood creatives are so awful there's a desperate need for fresh blood... well, yes - except that's been glaringly apparent for years now, and if anything ~~*their*~~ hiring practices have gotten even more insular. Almost as if "turning a profit" is secondary to other considerations - with "creating a quality product" way down the list, if it appears at all.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Should have clarified: I've no interest in my book being made into a (Hollywood) film. Not that this possibility would ever arise. Or if it did, I would ever permit that.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A screenplay seems like an easier way to make a story. You just have to write conversations and occasionally make someone pick an object up.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wrote a screenplay that placed as a semi and quarter finalist in the major contests and was told it'd make a decent blockbuster. I decided to write the book and it's a lot harder to get recognized or published.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        unironically use a pen name if you're a white guy or if your name sounds white. Hire a black woman to pitch it to publishers.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'll keep that in mind.

          Regardless I'm self publishing it and spending 25k marketing it. I have enough money.

          If it's successful I'll pitch that success to agents to consider the script.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Good luck to you anon

            1. Get "The Hollywood Standard" by Christopher Riley; this is your guide for proper formatting.
            2. Get a decent screenwriting program; I strongly recommend FadeIn as it's comparatively inexpensive and doesn't inundate you with superfluous features.
            3. Read Towne's script for Chinatown as it's the best screenplay ever written. What makes it so is that there is never any confusion about who is doing or saying what to whom despite how complicated the plot is. That's also the benchmark for what makes a screenplay great. Remember, you're writing a technical document, not a fricking DFW novel. The story has to leap out without fricking confounding everyone who reads it.
            4. Read Carruth's script for Upstream Color for the same reason. You could probably read A Topiary as well.
            5. Ignore all the lists of The Most Goodest Screenplay Ever because they're all wrong and conflate great movies with great screenplays. Example: Manhattan by Woody Allen has a scene that is four pages of uninterrupted dialog, a conversation between three men with no parentheticals, so it's unclear whether there's sarcasm or anger or what. It then ends with one line of direction: "He laughs." Who? There were three people talking? How? Is it nervous laughter? Again, it's a good film, but a very poorly written script because there is way too much ambiguity about who is saying what and why and to whom. It has to be clear.
            6. Then just read scripts from your favorite films.
            7. By this point you'll have intuited the three-act structure and story type: heroic crucible, etc.; you'll also have figured out that films average about 90 minutes divided equally among the three acts. One film which executes this perfectly is RoboCop; it hits those beats perfectly on the nose.

            This is enough to get you started. There's always something good to read about film, there's always a contest to enter, and it's worth your time to check out paid classes, even online.

            Good luck and happy writing.

            Solid advice

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yes, good luck
            if you're self-publishing the odds are really against you

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I wrote a script for episode zero of a TV show but I think it's really bad and formatted shitily.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Currently working on my John Lennon biopic and people keep getting confused over the beats.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any recommendations for where I can go to learn how to write screenplays? For free? Like any YT video series or whatever?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I would just read them. Make sure you put "a beat" every ten minutes or so.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Literally just google your favorite movie titles + "script"
        Most of them are listed in PDF by Script Slug
        Read those scripts and imitate your favorite styles for 5-10 years, completing as many full scripts as you can. Eventually you'll develop your own style. There are no shortcuts, but you can harm your progress by thinking there is some magic formula you can find in a how-to book. There is no formula.

        I'm more concerned about other things like
        1. Formatting, aren't there rules about margins and word count and font size I need to learn?
        2. Process, like what's the best way to take an idea and flesh it out? I imagine it's different for every writer, but I don't know anything

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think you could get by copying the formatting of published scripts roughly, and just make a glossary of the acronyms you encounter and all the types of words that need capitalization. You can't really learn how to imagine things though.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Formatting, aren't there rules about margins and word count and font size I need to learn?
          Yes, but if you use a screenwriting program it will automatically use the correct format. WriterSolo and KIT Scenarist are free.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Literally just google your favorite movie titles + "script"
      Most of them are listed in PDF by Script Slug
      Read those scripts and imitate your favorite styles for 5-10 years, completing as many full scripts as you can. Eventually you'll develop your own style. There are no shortcuts, but you can harm your progress by thinking there is some magic formula you can find in a how-to book. There is no formula.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      1. Get "The Hollywood Standard" by Christopher Riley; this is your guide for proper formatting.
      2. Get a decent screenwriting program; I strongly recommend FadeIn as it's comparatively inexpensive and doesn't inundate you with superfluous features.
      3. Read Towne's script for Chinatown as it's the best screenplay ever written. What makes it so is that there is never any confusion about who is doing or saying what to whom despite how complicated the plot is. That's also the benchmark for what makes a screenplay great. Remember, you're writing a technical document, not a fricking DFW novel. The story has to leap out without fricking confounding everyone who reads it.
      4. Read Carruth's script for Upstream Color for the same reason. You could probably read A Topiary as well.
      5. Ignore all the lists of The Most Goodest Screenplay Ever because they're all wrong and conflate great movies with great screenplays. Example: Manhattan by Woody Allen has a scene that is four pages of uninterrupted dialog, a conversation between three men with no parentheticals, so it's unclear whether there's sarcasm or anger or what. It then ends with one line of direction: "He laughs." Who? There were three people talking? How? Is it nervous laughter? Again, it's a good film, but a very poorly written script because there is way too much ambiguity about who is saying what and why and to whom. It has to be clear.
      6. Then just read scripts from your favorite films.
      7. By this point you'll have intuited the three-act structure and story type: heroic crucible, etc.; you'll also have figured out that films average about 90 minutes divided equally among the three acts. One film which executes this perfectly is RoboCop; it hits those beats perfectly on the nose.

      This is enough to get you started. There's always something good to read about film, there's always a contest to enter, and it's worth your time to check out paid classes, even online.

      Good luck and happy writing.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thank you for the help
        >Remember, you're writing a technical document,
        Oh that's good, I actually used to write guidance documents for military weapons systems. Some of the driest but most technically precise writing imaginable. Extremely specific statements about who is allowed to use something and exactly what the can do. Maybe that experience will carry over.
        I'd still need to learn to write dialog... but maybe that's possible.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        solid post
        >There's always something good to read about film
        any further recommendations?

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have about 10 or so in me noggin
    only just started typing them out

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm working on a pornographic comic book that I will make with the power of AI image generation and release for free onto the internet.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like a fun movie idea to watch this anon be held against his will and slowly tortured to death!

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Hey now, there's no need for rudeness.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Is this proompted from that one pic where the autist is going to eat his moltress' poop?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              JustinRPG was my favorite lolcow. Wonder what happened to him. Guess his wranglers cut internet access.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got an agent off the strength of a couple screenplays. I've had some productive meetings regarding some horror specs I wrote, those seem to generate interest. I work as a lawyer full-time, though, so the amount of time I can put into this is pretty minimal.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How did you manage to get the agent to read? I've had a hell of a shitty time with these low level assistants, managers and producers I've been dealing with. But I mainly just send cold queries out with ImdbPro.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think I sent cold queries for two years straight, essentially every week before I got a response. I ended up physically mailing an agent something which got his attention. Keep up with the cold queries, but I'd also try and get attention through screenplay competitions. Wish I had done that earlier, I've met a couple writers who got an agent a lot earlier than me through that.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      are horror scripts "in" at the moment?

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    how do you come up with ideas for original screenplays? I personally have a hard time generating ideas.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      For me it's a combination of
      - What kind of movie that I like ISN'T being made right now, but should be?
      - Music that inspires images/sequences in that genre
      - Actors who would work for characters in that world
      Once these things are aligned, then I usually get excited enough to start building out the story and figuring out the opening scene.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i love to self insert myself

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you have to ask you're in the wrong business

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        everyone has to start somewhere

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not if you don't have any ideas. They are the start. If you don't have ideas work an industrial lathe or become a Disney store greeter or something. You are not needed in the creative industry.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. Had coffee, smoked a pipe, and put in about two hours.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It makes me happy that 99% of """"""""""""writers""""""""""" are just plotplebs coming up with random sequences of events that sound cool in their head with absolutely no meaning behind them. These people wasting their time until they die under the ignorant idea that they have talent is a fate worse than death.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah, but it's my second effort and the first wasn't so amazing either. It's hard to make shit that you don't hate, even starting with a great idea, the minutiae of actually doing it really wears it down. Because in your minds eye, the script is perfect. You have an overarching plot. And you assume that the dialogue, etc all work. When you actually go to write all of it, the beautiful vision collapses because it's not perfect anymore. Ideas are a million times easier than execution. You can get addicted to having cool ideas, and never developing them, so that they stay perfect forever in your minds' eye

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do I write more 3 dimensional characters? I'm told my stories, plots and concepts are strong, but my characters are almost always underdeveloped and my dialogue is hit or miss.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      im no screenwriter but give them a personality. are they are a hardass cutthroat military man? are they some deadbeat who didnt graduate highschool? are they a family man working a boring office job? how do each of these characters talk? what are their motives? maybe try and do that for all your characters, to the point where i can identify whos talking without even needing you to identify whos who in the script.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a working class schmuck with a couple of ideas.
    If I try to flesh these out how do I go about selling them or getting them seen?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You're not even prepared to enter the industry

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        just tell me you fat lazy moron

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm trying to come up with an idea for a movie where two dudes try to extort the Catholic Church. I want to avoid making light of the sex abuse scandals though.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, I'm storyboarding!

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i was working on my magnum opus but then i realized the cia were reading my brainwaves and stole it all and sold it to cd projekt red over a decade ago. ive never even played cyberpunk 2077 and dont keep up with vidya at all, but my plot is a little too similar to not be called a rip off. still fun to work on sometimes tho

    i do have another im kind of working on but i need to learn more philosophy to pursue it further and im just lazy

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I wrote a novel that I sometimes fantasize could be made into a movie. The odds of both happening are below extremely low but it's fun to fantasize.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How much has AI fricked things? Are buyers paranoid about not getting AI stuff? Or do they not ask or care?

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I wish I could write a romantic comedy, but I can't so whatever

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sure you can. You can try it. I believe in you.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    dTjdNQKi

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