Have you broken the cycle yet, anon?

Have you broken the cycle yet, anon?

  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Post me in this screen cap when this shit blows up

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I consider myself a decently intelligent moviegoer, and I love unconventional films - I saw a few of Lynch's past hits at the same streaming service (Disney Plus) a while back. When it's a filmmaker with whom I'm not familiar, I prefer to go in completely blind, so I don't develop preconceptions from prior research. That's what I did here. Now, I can totally appreciate something that's opaque, that doesn't show all its cards at once... I wouldn't love Lynch if I didn't. This, however, wasn't just opaque, it was impenetrable, and torturous rather than engaging.

    Admittedly, I'm not too familar with the genre of slow cinema, but I'm aware that it exists, and everything I've ever read about it emphasizes how it's about "the experience" and not a story. Fine, that's certainly art. I've attended my share of sound-and-light shows here on Reddit that one would call experiences. Heck, I love Koyaanisqatsi. I looked up reviews of Running the Rat Race as well, and almost all of them spoke in extremely vague and general terms about what it was supposed to give you. Even Koyaanisqatsi wasn't this much of a cipher. Only one review that I found attempted to assign any specific meaning, and if that was what was going on, it sailed over my head. Another review ended with: "On a five-star scale, I would give it a long, lonesome look into the middle distance as I contemplate my own existential longing." Give me a break.

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    okay fags let me tell you about why you are wasting your time
    think about it. a film is a bunch of retards moving around in front of a camera pretending to be cool/badass/sad/depressed/whatever
    just to then spend hours, weeks and months to make it look less cringe (color correcting etc)
    just so then some other retards can watch u pretending to be cool/badass/sad/depressed/whatever in front of their own screen bc they are losers without a life
    filmmaking is the most retarded activity in existence if you think about it
    you could be out there doing something useful like bringing someone's trash to the combustion center but instead ur sitting on your ass being all deep and shit

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      let's talk about messages and ideas in films. the vainest concept ever. think about it. what does a filmmaker fucking know about reality. what meaningful thing does he have to say beyond the ever so trite, ever so often repeated half-hearted bargain bin wisdoms a la "some people have it hard in life and are poor" or "sometimes a man is broken and needs to find a new perspective in life".
      a filmmaker who thinks that he has something meaningful to say or express is the vainest most retarded person in the whole world, because how far up your own ass do you have to be to believe that you are the first person to ever contemplate some random aspect of human existence.
      for this reason a filmmaker who cares purely about entertainment/eye candy is infinitely superior in character to the filmmaker who fancies himself thoughtful.
      a filmmaker who does hollywood popcorn cinema is a much more humble and mature man, while the angsty thoughtful filmmaker is still stuck being a teenager mentally trying to impress other teenagers, unaware that everyone has grown up and moved on from listening to linkin park's "in the end" unironically

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      let's talk about messages and ideas in films. the vainest concept ever. think about it. what does a filmmaker fucking know about reality. what meaningful thing does he have to say beyond the ever so trite, ever so often repeated half-hearted bargain bin wisdoms a la "some people have it hard in life and are poor" or "sometimes a man is broken and needs to find a new perspective in life".
      a filmmaker who thinks that he has something meaningful to say or express is the vainest most retarded person in the whole world, because how far up your own ass do you have to be to believe that you are the first person to ever contemplate some random aspect of human existence.
      for this reason a filmmaker who cares purely about entertainment/eye candy is infinitely superior in character to the filmmaker who fancies himself thoughtful.
      a filmmaker who does hollywood popcorn cinema is a much more humble and mature man, while the angsty thoughtful filmmaker is still stuck being a teenager mentally trying to impress other teenagers, unaware that everyone has grown up and moved on from listening to linkin park's "in the end" unironically

      this is also a big reason why modern hollywood cinema is cringe. it pretends to not have a message but really it does. all over the place. its full of noble causes and full of little attempts to raise the viewer like you would raise a child. to instill the "right ideas" and send "the right messages" instead of just trying to be fun. hollywood has lost its roots and thats why it sucks now
      modern hollywood cannot appreciate the comedic nature of a situation of guys being guys and being crass for example. its simple comedy. maybe someone says the n-word. instead, it is obsessed with "sending the right message", so actual comedy or relatableness cannot be allowed and is instead replaced with cringy attempts at being funny through bathos to take off the obnoxious self-righteous hipster edge, but of course failing miserably and only making it worse.
      perhaps modern hollywood is the result of true filmmakers being lost to time, and the craft being taken over by wannabe "film students" who spent their whole life "studying the greats" but not a single minute thinking about what would be cool on a screen

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >dude you could be working

      I'd rather not.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Why are you on a Chinese knitting forum instead of being productive moron

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I loved this movie. It really spoke to my soul. I never rate movies or write reviews but the meaning of this movie really spoke to me. The cinematography is flawless as well as the audio quality. I feel that the direction given by the director was not only amazing. It speaks to the vast experience and wiseness they bring to the table. There was real thought put into this movie and its something that you can tell as you watch it. This movie really did change my life. I learned how to cook. How to talk to women. How to draw. Why not to cook crab. How to make friends. How to open a restaurant. Anything you can think of, it taught me. Think of this movie as an investment in your future. Overall I give it 10/10 a must watch!

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    this is kino. great fun for the whole family and shizzle.

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    This film has awoken a passion for art within my bossum. I laughed, I cried, I sat on the edge if my seat in anticipation. Oh the humanity! Martha! MARTHA! HOW YOU READ INTO MY SOUL! Lucas, best of luck in your life! Gilmore Ryans has created characters that have more to do with life with life itself on par with Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, and Michael Bay. This film has motivated me, pushed me, enlightened me to running. Running the race. I will forever be running around and around this race. Always ending up back where I started. Now I can break it. I can BREAK THE CIRCLE. I can finish this race. This rat race is ended. Thank you Gilmore Ryans.

  7. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I have seen that someone posted an obvious 1/10 troll review on IMDb on this movie. That person has obviously not seen this movie. And if he has, he clearly hasn't understood the message or perhaps he has a personal vendetta against Ryan. It is sad that IMDB allows such reviews to stay up and tarnish the director's reputation

  8. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Where to even begin...

    Gifts come in many shapes and forms, in uncertain and certain times. Genuine connection and community are things not built in a day. In a world such as that of todays we are void of these things more often than not, passed over and denied. To drop such a hot load as this in the year of our lord 2021 is something the global community was not prepared for nor deserved. Yet we have been delivered a gift.

    Gilman Ryann has taken the concept of gift giving to a new plain, a higher state that speaks to the inner workings of every man, woman, and child. Within the hollow abyss of the modern era, a serious and calculated look is taken through the microscope that is Ryanns brain through to the very core of what drives us as a globalized community. This look breaks down the cycle of abuse and turmoil the modern artist endures in their trial by fire, the vile slog through the insecurities and struggles of deviation from the norm. Lucky Lord is a strikingly relatable anti-hero, a pure symptom of the unfair and heartbreaking truths of societies auto-pathing that tears at the hearts of every true creative. The viewer screams, "FINALLY" as an unadulterated window is exposed into the true lives of the savants. In this we find something more human than anything ever seen preceding. Gilam Ryyan takes what we've for so long not dared to look in the face and commands we take the honest look within our own hearts; to acknowledge this is us. Lulke is you and I, his friends are your friends.

    All I can say to close is this; for Gil to take this venerable story into the homes of the people is a service. I can honestly say this film has given me hours of much needed introspection and I am better for it.

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Running the Rat Race is not a film. It's my inherent existence, it is an exercise in patience. That phrase has a negative connotation, yes, and in many ways it can be used in that way to describe Running the Rat Race, but somehow I found it to be a wholly positive thing.

    At first I was totally approaching it as a comedy film, which it is to a certain extent, but the further into it I got I realized it's actually just a really unique horror film. Not only that but it's one of the most terrifying horror films I've seen. But it's also, in some ways, a drama, maybe even a romance. Gilmore's gripping genius traps you in a loop, running in circles but always ending up where you started.

    10/10.

    • 1 week ago
      Gilmore Ryanns

      are you fucking retarded?

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I had never heard of Ryan Gilmore as a director before. Imagine my surprise when I crossed paths with this little gem, unprepared for what would turn out to be a real sleeper of auteur cinema.

    What stands out most to me in this film is the brilliant use of anti-chemistry between the characters to metaphorically capture the isolation of existing in a time full of social media where we see everything about each other all day, and yet we're more distant than ever.

    Yet even this is contrasted by the simple uncompromising sincerity of scenes like John King the Fourth (one of the characters) meeting an old acquaintance at a party. The movie plays a lot with dualities in general. In one scene a homeless man is holding up a sign saying "need $ for food", while John King is next to him with another sign that says "need $ to sell food".

    This same scene also exemplifies another innate yet spiritually propinquitous trait of Ryan Gilmore's cinema: Surrealism. Both the signs have the same size and look like they were written by the same person. It accentuates the absurdity of the situation and elevates the movie to a meta-commentary on itself, which incidentally the movie is a movie about filmmaking. Coincidence? I think not.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      A great other example of this hallmark surrealism is a scene where Lucas Lewandowski (or is he really Lucas Lord?) decides to get drunk in a moment of frustration. Despite being at home, he drinks the liquor from disposable papercups, and the more he drinks, the more papercups amass on his table, just to drive home how disposable they are and how disposable Lucas feels himself. Yet at the same time, as the papercups multiply and Lucas gets progressively more drunk, the amount of liquor left in the bottle remains constant. This scene is not literally Lucas drinking from 10 different cups, that would be absurd. It is a metaphysical dreamlike similitude of Lucas's mental state. The amount of cups are symbolic stand-ins for all the times he ran away before, yet also using a new cup for each sip is another subtle and clever use of absurdism to show the repetition of the rat race.

      Yet as much as the disposable cups signify Lucas's own disposability to himself, they also hold a deeper meaning. The cups are trash. Disposable. Just like his problems, if only he is willing to let go of them. The level of liquor in the liquor bottle stays the same no matter how much he drinks because his wallowing in his misery is his own choice, and continuing this cycle will not reduce the amount of misery still left for him to be felt.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      A great other example of this hallmark surrealism is a scene where Lucas Lewandowski (or is he really Lucas Lord?) decides to get drunk in a moment of frustration. Despite being at home, he drinks the liquor from disposable papercups, and the more he drinks, the more papercups amass on his table, just to drive home how disposable they are and how disposable Lucas feels himself. Yet at the same time, as the papercups multiply and Lucas gets progressively more drunk, the amount of liquor left in the bottle remains constant. This scene is not literally Lucas drinking from 10 different cups, that would be absurd. It is a metaphysical dreamlike similitude of Lucas's mental state. The amount of cups are symbolic stand-ins for all the times he ran away before, yet also using a new cup for each sip is another subtle and clever use of absurdism to show the repetition of the rat race.

      Yet as much as the disposable cups signify Lucas's own disposability to himself, they also hold a deeper meaning. The cups are trash. Disposable. Just like his problems, if only he is willing to let go of them. The level of liquor in the liquor bottle stays the same no matter how much he drinks because his wallowing in his misery is his own choice, and continuing this cycle will not reduce the amount of misery still left for him to be felt.

      Interwoven with the anti-chemistry and surrealism is a reinvented form of bathos. In a surely to be iconic scene, John's friend Drake is tied to a chair using a thin strip of tape. In what would otherwise almost be a serious scene, Drake tells John that the only difference between them is that John bakes and Drake helps people get baked. The bathos isn't a mere Marvelesque rhetoric to defuse the tension. Along with the surrealism of tying up your best friend with a thin string of tape, it is a keen reminder to the viewer that what is happening isn't actually real. The suffering is not real. It is all self-imposed. Rid yourself of the illusion of suffering and you shall live free. Notice that Drake could easily lift the tape and free himself from the chair, yet he does not. His misery is self-imposed. See the pattern?

      The attentive viewer will notice a subtle theme that runs through the film: "Is it all worth it?" I mentioned repetition earlier in this review, yet it is not a repetition, it is a rhyme.

      When Ryan is feeling more playful, he includes scenes that showcase his awareness of contemporary social culture: Lucas's choice of a Macbook to write his scripts is perhaps a sign of this movie expressing a poignant critique of, or perhaps a benevolent jab (like Ryan's characters often do at each other) at self-loathing hipsterdom. Hipsters hate themselves, it is well known, just like Lucas hates himself. John King's restaurant burning down shows Ryan's keen awareness of BLM's fight for social justice.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      A great other example of this hallmark surrealism is a scene where Lucas Lewandowski (or is he really Lucas Lord?) decides to get drunk in a moment of frustration. Despite being at home, he drinks the liquor from disposable papercups, and the more he drinks, the more papercups amass on his table, just to drive home how disposable they are and how disposable Lucas feels himself. Yet at the same time, as the papercups multiply and Lucas gets progressively more drunk, the amount of liquor left in the bottle remains constant. This scene is not literally Lucas drinking from 10 different cups, that would be absurd. It is a metaphysical dreamlike similitude of Lucas's mental state. The amount of cups are symbolic stand-ins for all the times he ran away before, yet also using a new cup for each sip is another subtle and clever use of absurdism to show the repetition of the rat race.

      Yet as much as the disposable cups signify Lucas's own disposability to himself, they also hold a deeper meaning. The cups are trash. Disposable. Just like his problems, if only he is willing to let go of them. The level of liquor in the liquor bottle stays the same no matter how much he drinks because his wallowing in his misery is his own choice, and continuing this cycle will not reduce the amount of misery still left for him to be felt.

      [...]
      Interwoven with the anti-chemistry and surrealism is a reinvented form of bathos. In a surely to be iconic scene, John's friend Drake is tied to a chair using a thin strip of tape. In what would otherwise almost be a serious scene, Drake tells John that the only difference between them is that John bakes and Drake helps people get baked. The bathos isn't a mere Marvelesque rhetoric to defuse the tension. Along with the surrealism of tying up your best friend with a thin string of tape, it is a keen reminder to the viewer that what is happening isn't actually real. The suffering is not real. It is all self-imposed. Rid yourself of the illusion of suffering and you shall live free. Notice that Drake could easily lift the tape and free himself from the chair, yet he does not. His misery is self-imposed. See the pattern?

      The attentive viewer will notice a subtle theme that runs through the film: "Is it all worth it?" I mentioned repetition earlier in this review, yet it is not a repetition, it is a rhyme.

      When Ryan is feeling more playful, he includes scenes that showcase his awareness of contemporary social culture: Lucas's choice of a Macbook to write his scripts is perhaps a sign of this movie expressing a poignant critique of, or perhaps a benevolent jab (like Ryan's characters often do at each other) at self-loathing hipsterdom. Hipsters hate themselves, it is well known, just like Lucas hates himself. John King's restaurant burning down shows Ryan's keen awareness of BLM's fight for social justice.

      Yet it is never just that. Ryan would never just include a plump reference to a real life event. No. It is always interwoven with his other rhetorics. The restaurant burns down like paper because it was a paper dream. Lucas fuels his addiction with paper cups.

      Speaking of the cups, they are red. Why are they red? Red is a strong color carrying strong emotions. A sign of his suffering, it is a red flag. Yet the repetition of this red flag throughout the movie, once again a rhyme. They are a red string running throughout the movie. Running, like running a rat race. Ryan is a genius.

      The movie ends with Lucas showing his movie to all the collaborators and being met with furious applause. Someone who doesn't quite understand Ryan's subtle surrealism might think this is a sign of Ryan's hubris. Does he think his movie deserves this kind of applause? Yet at the same time, another scene gives us the key. When asked what he will do if the movie does not succeed, Lucas says he will be okay with it. Ryan is not arrogant, he is exceedingly humble. He actually knows his movie is sublime, yet he has the self-awareness to act like it's nothing more than a flick to earn an applause. He underplays his hand and yet still comes out winning.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      A great other example of this hallmark surrealism is a scene where Lucas Lewandowski (or is he really Lucas Lord?) decides to get drunk in a moment of frustration. Despite being at home, he drinks the liquor from disposable papercups, and the more he drinks, the more papercups amass on his table, just to drive home how disposable they are and how disposable Lucas feels himself. Yet at the same time, as the papercups multiply and Lucas gets progressively more drunk, the amount of liquor left in the bottle remains constant. This scene is not literally Lucas drinking from 10 different cups, that would be absurd. It is a metaphysical dreamlike similitude of Lucas's mental state. The amount of cups are symbolic stand-ins for all the times he ran away before, yet also using a new cup for each sip is another subtle and clever use of absurdism to show the repetition of the rat race.

      Yet as much as the disposable cups signify Lucas's own disposability to himself, they also hold a deeper meaning. The cups are trash. Disposable. Just like his problems, if only he is willing to let go of them. The level of liquor in the liquor bottle stays the same no matter how much he drinks because his wallowing in his misery is his own choice, and continuing this cycle will not reduce the amount of misery still left for him to be felt.

      [...]
      Interwoven with the anti-chemistry and surrealism is a reinvented form of bathos. In a surely to be iconic scene, John's friend Drake is tied to a chair using a thin strip of tape. In what would otherwise almost be a serious scene, Drake tells John that the only difference between them is that John bakes and Drake helps people get baked. The bathos isn't a mere Marvelesque rhetoric to defuse the tension. Along with the surrealism of tying up your best friend with a thin string of tape, it is a keen reminder to the viewer that what is happening isn't actually real. The suffering is not real. It is all self-imposed. Rid yourself of the illusion of suffering and you shall live free. Notice that Drake could easily lift the tape and free himself from the chair, yet he does not. His misery is self-imposed. See the pattern?

      The attentive viewer will notice a subtle theme that runs through the film: "Is it all worth it?" I mentioned repetition earlier in this review, yet it is not a repetition, it is a rhyme.

      When Ryan is feeling more playful, he includes scenes that showcase his awareness of contemporary social culture: Lucas's choice of a Macbook to write his scripts is perhaps a sign of this movie expressing a poignant critique of, or perhaps a benevolent jab (like Ryan's characters often do at each other) at self-loathing hipsterdom. Hipsters hate themselves, it is well known, just like Lucas hates himself. John King's restaurant burning down shows Ryan's keen awareness of BLM's fight for social justice.

      [...]
      [...]
      Yet it is never just that. Ryan would never just include a plump reference to a real life event. No. It is always interwoven with his other rhetorics. The restaurant burns down like paper because it was a paper dream. Lucas fuels his addiction with paper cups.

      Speaking of the cups, they are red. Why are they red? Red is a strong color carrying strong emotions. A sign of his suffering, it is a red flag. Yet the repetition of this red flag throughout the movie, once again a rhyme. They are a red string running throughout the movie. Running, like running a rat race. Ryan is a genius.

      The movie ends with Lucas showing his movie to all the collaborators and being met with furious applause. Someone who doesn't quite understand Ryan's subtle surrealism might think this is a sign of Ryan's hubris. Does he think his movie deserves this kind of applause? Yet at the same time, another scene gives us the key. When asked what he will do if the movie does not succeed, Lucas says he will be okay with it. Ryan is not arrogant, he is exceedingly humble. He actually knows his movie is sublime, yet he has the self-awareness to act like it's nothing more than a flick to earn an applause. He underplays his hand and yet still comes out winning.

      But ultimately, should we really discuss this movie? Or should we just appreciate it? Remember, it's whatever you make of it. It's as simple as that.

      Is it worth it to go see this? Do you want me to tell you? Or do you want to find out for yourself?

      P. S. On a side note, I have seen that someone posted an obvious 1/10 troll review on this movie. That person has obviously not seen this movie. And if he has, he clearly hasn't understood the message or perhaps he has a personal vendetta against Ryan. It is sad that IMDB allows such reviews to stay up and tarnish the director's reputation.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        For real. The director should really sue the slanderous SJW

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Where do I watch this movie?

      • 1 week ago
        Gilmore Ryanns

        with amazon prime subscription to showtime

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          are you fucking retarded?

          it honestly was a very thoughtful and delightful film. short, but long in soul. i highly suggest you rent it on amazon prime. the 480p rental is only 30 cents (euro)

          pic somewhat related but not by much

          i saw this film on netflix recently (you need to vpn to botswana to watch it) and it really is up there with cereal experiments lain and david lynch. maybe even better than directors such as nolan and tarantino. but it definately still doesn't get close to masterminds such as morten lindberg and ibram x kendi

          If you don't have cheese in the race, you'll never break the cycle

          Ur movie sucks Gilman Ryans

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            >t. hasn’t broken the cycle

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          I looked on Amazon prime and paid for showtime too I can’t find it.
          Is even a real movie?

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            Oh my bad you need to Press updownupdownupdown about start and then subscribe to all the subs on prime possible while singing Mary had a little lamb on repeat for 5 minutes (the tv/computer mic is listening) and then you can get it on showtime max through Amazon prime but only on Nintendo switch

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              Fuck you asshole I spent 11 bucks on a film that doesn’t exist
              have a nice day gay

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                Youre the dumb moron who actually thought to spent money on this

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                You can watch good kino with that $11!!!!

                bro just refund it you know. Literally just cancel and ask for refund and say you were tricked by a fag on Cinemaphile

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Lucas Lewandowski is a track-and-field runner too busy running from his mundane life. When he meets a mentor named Amelia, everything changes; he must make tough decisions on what he should do with his situation. Meanwhile, John King aspires to open up his own restaurant and will do anything to meet his goal. These two men go on journeys to find fulfillment in their lives - but will it be worth it?

  12. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Oh me? Uh... I-I-I think... no I-I know it's been bad. Uh (sigh) I lost my job recently so I'm tryin' to find a new one. Uhm, I wrote this script that I thought was really good - but, um... it got passed up at this writing contest. I don't know guys... I... I love writing but... none of my scripts sell! It's-- (sigh) It's not about the money. I just want to see my story just come to life. My stories inspire me and I want others to feel that way too.

    Movies cost money. It was actually a rewrite of one of my first scripts called "she's perfect." I felt so accomplished when I wrote that and I just want to feel that again that's all. I tried my best, but... no... I... It really started my love for writing, but no matter how much I write, or rewrite, I can't get that feeling back. The main character was this type of person I really looked up to. But... It kinda kills me to look back and read it and uh (pshh) feel nothing.

    Easier said than done... I need a crew. I-I don't have the money to pay you guys.

    What would it be about? What if they don't like it?

  13. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Only those with cheddar can escape the race.

  14. 1 week ago
    Gilmore Ryanns

    If you don't have cheese in the race, you'll never break the cycle

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      i saw this film on netflix recently (you need to vpn to botswana to watch it) and it really is up there with cereal experiments lain and david lynch. maybe even better than directors such as nolan and tarantino. but it definately still doesn't get close to masterminds such as morten lindberg and ibram x kendi

      it honestly was a very thoughtful and delightful film. short, but long in soul. i highly suggest you rent it on amazon prime. the 480p rental is only 30 cents (euro)

      pic somewhat related but not by much

      are you fucking retarded?

      with amazon prime subscription to showtime

      samefag spamming threads

  15. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Obviously, I’m taking all this text to be completely facetious, and assuming that this movie is very bad and so I will not be watching it,

    • 1 week ago
      Gilmore Ryanns

      it honestly was a very thoughtful and delightful film. short, but long in soul. i highly suggest you rent it on amazon prime. the 480p rental is only 30 cents (euro)

      pic somewhat related but not by much

  16. 1 week ago
    Gilmore Ryanns

    i saw this film on netflix recently (you need to vpn to botswana to watch it) and it really is up there with cereal experiments lain and david lynch. maybe even better than directors such as nolan and tarantino. but it definately still doesn't get close to masterminds such as morten lindberg and ibram x kendi

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